Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə38/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   ...   114

common people and their lack of knowledge, and that in reality God acts
and governs all things from the necessity of his own nature and perfection
alone, and his decrees and volitions are eternal truths and always involve
necessity. This is the ¢rst point that I proposed to explain and prove.
[
11] Now let us pass to the second point, running through Scripture,
to see what it teaches about the
66
natural light of reason and this divine
law. The ¢rst thing that strikes us is the history of the ¢rst man where it
is narrated that God forbade Adam to eat of the fruit of ‘the tree of the
knowledge of good and evil’,
4
which seems to mean that God instructed
Adam to do good, and to seek it under the aspect of good and not as the
opposite of what is bad, that is, to seek good for the love of good rather
than from the fear of harm. For as we have already shown, he who does
good from a true love and knowledge of good, acts freely and with a
constant purpose, but he who does good from fear of su¡ering injury, is
simply driven to avoid what is bad, like a slave, and lives at the command
of another. Hence, this one prohibition laid by God on Adam entails the
whole divine law and agrees fully with the dictate of the natural light of
reason. It would not be di⁄cult to explain the whole history, or parable,
of the ¢rst man on this basis, but I prefer to let it go. I cannot be abso-
lutely sure whether my explanation agrees with the intention of the wri-
ter, and many people do not concede that this history is a parable, but
insist it is a straightforward narrative.
[
12] It will be better therefore to adduce other passages of Scripture and
especially passages written by one who speaks according to the natural
light of reason in which he surpassed all the wise men of his time, and
whose opinions the people regarded with as much veneration as those of
the prophets. I mean Solomon, who is more highly commended in the
sacred writings for his prudence and wisdom than for his prophecy
and piety. In his ‘Proverbs’ he calls human understanding the fountain of
true life and locates misfortune in stupidity alone. This is what he says
at
16.22: ‘understanding is the fountain of life to him who is lord of it,
5
and the punishment of the stupid is their stupidity’, where we should
4
Genesis
2.17.
5
Spinoza’s footnote: a Hebrew idiom. He who has something or possesses it in his nature is said to be
a lord of that thing.Thus a bird is called, in Hebrew, a ‘lord of wings’, because it has wings. An intel-
ligent man is called a ‘lord of intellect’, because he has intellect.
On the divine law
65


note that ‘life’ in the Hebrew certainly means true life, as is evident from
Deuteronomy
30.19. He therefore located the fruit of the understanding in
true life alone and punishment exclusively in the lack of it, and this agrees
completely with our fourth point above about the natural divine law. The
same wise man also plainly taught that this fountain of life, or the under-
standing alone, prescribes laws to the wise, as we have often shown. He says
(
13.14): ‘The law of the wise
67
man’ (is) ‘the fount of life’, i.e., the under-
standing, as is clear from the text just quoted. Furthermore,
3.13 expressly
teaches that understanding gives a person happiness and joy and confers
true peace of mind. For he says,‘blessed is the man who ¢nds knowledge,
and the son of man who acquires understanding’. The reason is (as verses
16 and 17 go on to say) because it ‘directly gives length of days
6
and indir-
ectly riches and honour; its ways’ (which are presumably revealed by
knowledge) ‘are pleasant, and all its paths are peace’. The wise alone
therefore in Solomon’s view live with a peaceful and stable purpose, not
like the impious whose minds £uctuate between di¡erent passions, and
therefore (as Isaiah
57.20 also says) possess neither peace nor calm.
Finally, in these ‘Proverbs’ of Solomon we should take special notice of
the
second chapter
, because its contents con¢rm our position as clearly
as can be. Verse
3 of this chapter begins: ‘For if you cry out for wisdom,
and raise your voice for understanding, etc., then you will understand
the fear of God, and you will ¢nd the knowledge of God’ (or rather ‘love’;
for the word Jadah signi¢es both these things); ‘for’ (note this well) ‘God
gives wisdom; from his mouth’ (£ow) ‘knowledge and prudence’. In these
words he very clearly indicates, ¢rstly, that wisdom or understanding
alone teaches us to fear God wisely, i.e., to worship him with a true wor-
ship. Secondly, he teaches that wisdom and knowledge £ow from the
mouth of God and that God provides them; this is what we too showed
above ^ that our intellect and our knowledge depend upon the idea or
knowledge of God alone and take their origin from it and are perfected
by it.
He then goes on, in verse
9, to teach in the most explicit words that
this knowledge contains true morality and politics and that these are
derived from it: ‘then will you understand justice and judgment and
righteousness’ (and) ‘every good way’. Not content with this, he con-
tinues: ‘when knowledge shall enter
68
into your heart, and wisdom shall
6
Spinoza’s footnote: a Hebrew idiom, which merely signi¢es life.
Theological-Political Treatise
66


be sweet to you, then will your foresight
7
watch over you, and your
prudence protect you’. All this is plainly consistent with natural knowl-
edge; for it teaches ethics and true virtue, after we have acquired a
knowledge of things and have tasted the excellence of learning. Thus, in
Solomon’s view also, the happiness and peace of the person who culti-
vates natural understanding chie£y depend, not upon the realm of for-
tune (i.e., the external assistance of God), but upon their own internal
power (or the internal assistance of God), because they preserve them-
selves best by alertness, action and good counsel.
Finally we must not forget this passage of Paul, found at Romans
1.20,
where (as Tremellius translates it from the Syriac text)
8
Paul says,‘for the
hidden things of God, from the creation of the world, are seen through
the understanding in his creatures, as well as his power and divinity
which is for ever, so that they are without a way of escape’. With this he
indicates plainly enough that each man fully understands by the natural
light of reason the power of God, and His eternal divinity, by which men
can know and deduce what they should seek and what they should avoid.
Hence Paul concludes that all are without a way of escape and can not be
excused by ignorance, though assuredly they could have been excused
were he talking about supernatural inspiration, the su¡ering of Christ in
the £esh, the resurrection, etc. This is why, immediately below, at verse
24, he continues: ‘for this reason God gave them over to the ¢lthy lusts
of their heart’, and so on, down to the end of the chapter, where he is
describing the vices of ignorance. This also agrees with the passage from
the Proverbs of Solomon,
16.22 quoted above: ‘the punishment of the
stupid is their stupidity’. So it is not surprising that Paul says that
wrongdoers have no excuse. As each man sows, so he reaps; from bad
things, bad things necessarily follow, unless wisely corrected; from good
things, good things necessarily follow, if allied with constancy of pur-
pose. Thus the Bible fully endorses the natural light of reason and the
natural divine law. And thus I have done what I proposed to do in this
chapter.
7
Spinoza’s note: mezima properly signi¢es thought, deliberation, and vigilance.
8
Tremellius and Junius published a Latin translation of the Old Testament and Apocrypha in
1575^9
which was in common use among Protestants. Some later editions added Tremellius’ translation of
the Syriac version of the NewTestament.
On the divine law
67




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə