Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə40/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   ...   114

God’ and ‘God’s tents’ and living in them signi¢es happiness and peace of
mind, not the mountain of Jerusalem
72
or the tabernacle of Moses; for no
one lived in these places, and they were served by men from the tribe of
Levi alone. Further, all those opinions of Solomon’s which I cited in the
previous chapter
hold out the promise of true happiness in return for
cultivating understanding and wisdom alone, namely, that by wisdom in
the end one will understand the fear of God and ¢nd knowledge of Him.
[
5] On the other hand, it is clear from Jeremiah that after the
destruction of their commonwealth the Hebrews were not obliged to
keep up the ceremonies. When he saw that the destruction of the city
was imminent, he prophesied it and said: ‘God loves only those who
know and understand that He himself practises loving-kindness, good
judgment and justice in the world, and hence, from now on, only those
who know this are to be esteemed worthy of praise’ (see
9.23). It is as if he
were saying that after the destruction of the city God asked for nothing
particular from the Jews requiring of them only [that they uphold] the
natural law by which all men are bound. The New Testament fully con-
¢rms the same thing, for as we said, it o¡ers only moral teaching, and
promises as a reward the kingdom of heaven, and the Apostles abolished
the ceremonies as soon as the Gospel began to be preached to other
nations which were subject to the laws of a di¡erent state.
As for the Pharisees retaining the [ceremonies] or at least a great part of
them after the loss of their state, they did this more in a spirit of opposition
to the Christians than to please God. For when they were led away into
captivity in Babylon after the ¢rst destruction of the city, they immediately
neglected the ceremonies, since at that time, so far as I know, they were
not yet divided into sects. In fact they completely abandoned the Law
of Moses, and let the ordinances of their country fall into oblivion as
obviously super£uous, and began to mingle with other nations, as is
abundantly clear from Ezra and Nehemiah.
Thus, now that their state is dissolved, there is no doubt that the Jews
are no more bound by the Law of Moses than they were before the com-
mencement of their community and state. For while they dwelt among
other peoples before the exodus from Egypt, they had no special laws, and
were bound only by the natural law and, indubitably, the law of the state in
which they were living, so far as it did not con£ict with the natural divine
law. As for the fact that the patriarchs sacri¢ced to God, I think that they
On ceremonies and narratives
71


did so in order to rouse their hearts to greater devotion, for they had been
accustomed to sacri¢ces from childhood. Everyone had been thoroughly
familiar with sacri¢ce from the
73
time of Enoch, which hence stimulated
their devotion more than anything else. Thus the patriarchs sacri¢ced to
God, not because of a divine law commanding them to do so, nor because
they were schooled in the universal foundations of the divine law, but
merely from the custom of the time. If they did it at anyone’s command,
that command was merely the law of the state in which they were living,
which also applied to them (as we have already noted here and in chapter
3
in relation to Melchizedek).
[
6] These passages, I think, support my position with the authority of
the Bible. It remains now to show how and why ceremonies served to pre-
serve and maintain the state of the Hebrews. I shall demonstrate this from
universal principles in as few words as I can.
[
7] Society is extremely useful, indeed wholly essential, not only for liv-
ing safe from enemies but also for acquiring many other advantages. For
unless human beings were willing to give each other mutual assistance,
each one’s own personal skill and time would be inadequate to sustain and
preserve him as much as would otherwise be possible. For people are not
equally able to do everything, nor would each individual on his own be able
to get what he does not have. He would have neither the capacity nor the
time to plough, sow, reap, grind, cook, weave and sew for himself as well as
doing the many other things that are needed to sustain life ^ not to men-
tion at this point the arts and sciences, which are also supremely necessary
to the perfection of human nature and its happiness. For we see that those
who lead primitive lives, without any political organization, lead wretched
and brutish lives; yet, even so, they only manage to obtain the few crude
and miserable things that they do have by means of mutual assistance.
[
8] Now if human beings were so constituted by nature that they desired
nothing but what true reason points them to, society would surely need no
laws; men would only need to learn true moral doctrine, in order to do
what is truly useful of their own accord with upright and free mind. But
they are not so constituted, far from it. All men do indeed seek their own
interest, but it is not from the dictate of sound reason; for the most part
they pursue things and judge them to be in their interest merely because
Theological-Political Treatise
72


they are carried away by sensual desire and by their passions (which have
no regard for the future and for other
74
things). This is why no society can
subsist without government and compulsion, and hence laws, which
moderate and restrain desires. However human nature does not allow itself
to be absolutely compelled, and as the tragedian Seneca says,
8
no one has
maintained a violent re
´ gime for long; it is moderate re´gimes that endure.
For while men are acting from fear alone, they are doing what they do not
at all want to do; they have no reason of interest or necessity for doing what
they do; they seek merely to avoid punishment or even execution. Indeed,
they cannot help but rejoice when their ruler su¡ers pain or loss, even if
this involves them in great su¡ering themselves; they cannot help but wish
him every calamity and in£ict it themselves when they can. Moreover there
is nothing that people ¢nd less tolerable than to be ruled by their equals
and serve them; and nothing is more di⁄cult than to deprive people of
liberty once it has been granted.
[
9] It follows from all this, ¢rst, that either the whole of society (if this is
possible) should hold power together, collegially, so that all are subject to
themselves and nobody must serve their equal, or else a few men [hold
power], or if one man alone holds power, he will need to have something
above ordinary human nature ^ or at least strive with all his resources to
convince the common people that he has. Secondly, in any form of state
the laws should be so drawn up that people are restrained less by fear than
hope of something good which they very much desire; for in this way
everybody will do his duty willingly. Finally, since obedience consists in
carrying out commands on the sole authority of a ruler, it follows that
[such subordination] has no place in a society whose government is in the
hands of all and where laws are made by common consent. In such a
society, whether the number of laws is increased or reduced, the people
still remain just as free, since they are not acting under the authority of
another but by their own proper consent. The opposite is the case when
one man alone holds power absolutely, for all are carrying out the com-
mands of government on the sole authority of a single person. Hence,
unless people have been raised from the outset to be subservient to the
ruler’s every word, he will ¢nd it di⁄cult to institute new laws when they
are needed and to take away the people’s liberty once it has been granted.
8
Seneca, Trojan Women,
258^9.
On ceremonies and narratives
73




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə