Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə43/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   ...   114

teaching about what relates to true salvation. For those who insist that
there is no sound reason in them are prevented from proving this by
means of reason. And if they claim that they have something within them
which is above reason, it is a mere ¢ction and far beneath reason, as their
usual way of life has already proved clearly enough. But there is no need to
speak more candidly about these things.
[
20] I would add just this, that we can know no one except from his
works. Anyone therefore who abounds in the fruits of love, joy, peace,
long-su¡ering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-
control, against whom (as Paul says in his Epistle to the Galatians
5.22)
there is no law, he, whether he has been taught by reason alone or by
Scripture alone, has truly been taught by God, and is altogether happy.
With this I have said everything that I proposed to say about the
divine law.
Theological-Political Treatise
80


chapter 6
81
On miracles
[
1] Just as men habitually call that knowledge which surpasses human
understanding ‘divinity’, so they likewise classify any phenomenon whose
cause is unknown by the common people ‘divine’ or a work of God. For the
common people imagine that the power and providence of God are most
clearly evident when they see something happen contrary to the usual
course of things and their habitual views about nature, especially should it
turn out to their bene¢t or advantage. They also suppose the existence of
God is proven by nothing more clearly than from what they perceive as
nature failing to follow its normal course. For this reason they suppose that
all those who explain or attempt to explain phenomena and miracles by
natural causes, are doing away with God or at least divine providence.They
evidently hold that God is inactive whilst nature follows its normal course
and, conversely, that the power of nature and natural causes are super-
£uous whenever God is active. Hence, they imagine that there are two
powers, distinct from each other, the power of God and the power of natural
things, and that the latter is determined by God in some way or, as most men
think in our day, created by him. But what they understand by these powers,
and what they understand by God and nature, they certainly do not know,
except that they imagine the power of God to be like the authority of royal
majesty, and the power of nature to be like a force and impetus.
The common people therefore call unusual works of nature miracles
or works of God and do not want to know the natural causes of things,
partly from devotion and partly from zeal to oppose those who pursue
natural philosophy. They desire only to hear about that of which they are
most ignorant and consequently about which they marvel most. Evi-
dently, this is because they can only adore God, and ascribe all things to
81


his will and governance, by ignoring natural causes and evincing wonder
at what is outside the normal course of nature, and revere the power of
God best when they envisage the power of nature as if it were subdued
by God. This attitude seems to originate among the ¢rst Jews. They
narrated miraculous stories to convince the pagans of their day, who
adored visible gods, like the sun, the moon, water, air, and so on, that
those gods were weak and inconstant
82
or mutable, and subordinate to the
invisible God. They also wanted to show that the whole of nature was
directed by the governance of the God whom they adored solely for their
own bene¢t. People have always been so drawn to this idea that to this
day they have not ceased to invent miracles, in order to foment the belief
that they are dearer to God than others and are the ultimate reason for
God’s creation and continual governance of all things. What will the
common people not arrogate to themselves in their foolishness! They
have no sound conception of either God or nature and, confusing God’s
decrees with human decisions, consider nature to be so limited that they
believe men are its most important part.
[
2] But this is quite enough about the opinions and prejudices of the
common people regarding nature and miracles. We should now put this
question into proper order. I will show:
(
1) that nothing happens contrary to nature, but nature maintains an
eternal, ¢xed and immutable order, and at the same time demonstrate what
should be understood by the term ‘miracle’
(
2) that from miracles we cannot know about either the essence or the
existence or the providence of God, but rather that all three are much better
grasped from the ¢xed and unchangeable order of nature.
(
3) Iwill show from some examples in the Bible that by the decrees, volitions
and providence of God, Scripture itself means nothing other than the order of
nature which necessarily follows from his eternal law.
(
4) Finally, Iwill discuss the method required for [correctly] interpreting the
miracles narrated in the Bible and what we should particularly notice in such
miracle narratives. These are the chief points in the argument of this chapter,
and I think that they are also very relevant to the aim of the work as a whole.
[
3] (1) The ¢rst point is easily demonstrated from what we proved in
chapter
4
about the divine law, namely, that all that God wills or determines
involves eternal necessity and truth. From the fact that God’s understanding
Theological-Political Treatise
82




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə