Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə41/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   ...   114

[
10] In the light of these general re£ections, let us now consider the
Hebrew commonwealth. As soon as they departed from Egypt, they were
no longer under the jurisdiction of any other nation, and thus had the
freedom to enact new laws or
75
make new rules as they pleased and to
establish a state wherever they might wish and occupy whatever lands they
wanted. However, they were not in any way ¢t to make laws wisely or
organize a government in a collegial manner among themselves; for they
were all of rude intelligence and down-trodden by the miseries of slavery.
Government therefore had to remain in the hands of one man alone who
would rule the others, compel them by force, and make laws for them, and
interpret those laws subsequently. Moses was well equipped to hold power
since he far excelled the rest with a divine virtue and convinced the people
of this by o¡ering them many examples of it (see Exodus
14, last verse, and
19:9). On the basis of this divine virtue, which was the source of his power,
he made laws and prescribed them to the people. But in all this he took
great care to ensure that the people would do its duty willingly and not
through fear. Two factors most in£uenced him to take this approach: the
obstinate character of the people (which does not allow itself to be coerced
by force alone), and the threat of war. For in war it is vital to success to
encourage the soldiers rather than to cow them with threats and punish-
ments, for each soldier is more eager to win distinction by gallantry and
courage than merely to avoid punishment.
[
11] This is why Moses, with his virtue and by divine command,
introduced religion into the commonwealth, so that the people would do
its duty more from devotion than from fear. Then he bound them to him
with bene¢ts, and by divine inspiration made many promises to them for
the future. He did not make the laws too severe, as anyone who has stu-
died them will readily concede, particularly if he looks at the circum-
stances required for the condemnation of a defendant.
9
And ¢nally, in
order that a people which could not run its own a¡airs should depend
upon the words of its ruler, he did not permit them, accustomed as they
were to slavery, to do anything at their own pleasure. They could do
nothing without being obliged at the same time to bring to mind a law
and follow commands that depended upon the will of the ruler alone.
They were not permitted to plough or sow or reap as they pleased, nor
9
Deuteronomy
17.6, 19.15.
Theological-Political Treatise
74


could they eat or dress or shave their heads or beards as they pleased, but
all in accordance with a ¢xed and speci¢c ordinance of the law. They
could not rejoice or do anything at all except in obedience to orders and
commands prescribed by the law. Not only that, but they were obliged to
have certain symbols on their doorposts, in their hands and between
their eyes, to remind them
76
continually of their obedience.
[
12] This then was the purpose of the ceremonies, that they [i.e. the
people] should do nothing at their own discretion and everything at the
command of another, and should confess by their every action and thought
that they did not exist in their own right at all but were entirely subject to
someone else. From all of this it is clearer than daylight that ceremonies
have no connection with happiness, and that the ceremonies of the Old
Testament, and indeed the entire Law of Moses, related to nothing but
the Hebrew state and consequently nothing other than material bene¢ts.
[
13] Concerning Christian ceremonies, namely baptism, the Lord’s
supper, feast-days, public prayers, and any others that are and always have
been common to the whole of Christianity ^ if they actually were instituted
by Christ or the Apostles (which is still not clear to me), they were insti-
tuted only as external signs of a universal church and not as things that
contribute to happiness or have any sanctity in them. Hence, although
these ceremonies were not instituted for the purpose of [upholding] a
state, they were instituted only for a community as a whole. Conse-
quently, a man living alone is not bound by them, and anyone who lives
under a government where the Christian religion is forbidden is obliged
to do without them and yet will be able to live a good life notwithstand-
ing. We have an example of this in the empire of Japan, where the
Christian religion is forbidden and the Dutch who live there, must
abstain from all external worship by command of the [Dutch] East India
Company.
10
I do not think at the moment I can con¢rm this by another
instance; yet it would not be hard to deduce the point itself also from the
principles of the New Testament, and perhaps provide further evidence
10
The Japanese Shogunate forced the English to leave Japan in
1623, the Spaniards in 1624 and the
Portuguese in
1638, leaving the Dutch as the only Europeans permitted to maintain a trading
‘factory’ in Japan (at Nagasaki).This was on condition that they did not promote, or try to convert
any Japanese to, Christianity, an understanding decried in Europe as shamefully base subservience
on the part of the Dutch.
On ceremonies and narratives
75


with clear testimonies, but I am willing to let this go, as I am anxious to
get on to other things. I move on then to the second topic that I pro-
posed to deal with in this chapter, namely, for whom, and why, belief in the
narratives contained in the Bible is necessary. To investigate this question
by the light of natural reason, it seems one should proceed as follows.
[
14] Anyone seeking to persuade or dissuade people of something
which is not known by itself, must, to gain their acquiescence, deduce it
from things already accepted, convincing them by means of experience
or reason. That is, one must convince them either by things which they
know through their senses happen in nature or from clear intellectual
concepts evident in themselves. However, unless the experience is such
as to be plainly and distinctly understood, it will, even though it may
convince a person, still not
77
su⁄ce to sway the understanding and dis-
sipate its doubts as e¡ectively as when the conclusion is deduced from
intellectual axioms alone, that is, solely by the power of the under-
standing and in the order in which it comprehends things. This is espe-
cially so where it is a spiritual matter that is in question with no
connection with the senses.
Often though, a long chain of linked inferences is required, to come to
¢rm conclusions from basic ideas alone. Furthermore, this requires great
caution and perspicacity and supreme mental discipline, qualities only
seldom met with among human beings. People prefer to be taught by
experience than to deduce all their ideas from a few premises and con-
nect these together. Consequently, where someone seeks to teach a whole
nation, not to speak of the entire human race, and wants to be under-
stood by everybody, he must substantiate his points by experience alone
and thoroughly adapt his arguments and the de¢nitions of his teaching
to the capacity of the common people (the majority of mankind), and not
make a chain of inferences or advance de¢nitions linking his arguments
together. Otherwise he will be writing only for the learned, that is, he
will be intelligible only to what is, in comparison with the rest of man-
kind, a very small handful of people.
[
15] Therefore since all of Scripture was revealed for the bene¢t of a
whole people in the ¢rst place and, ultimately, for the entire human race,
its contents had necessarily to be entirely adjusted to the capacity of the
common people and substantiated by experience alone.
Theological-Political Treatise
76




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə