Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə39/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   ...   114

chapter 5
69
On the reason why ceremonies were instituted, and
on belief in the historical narratives, i.e. for what
reason and for whom such belief is necessary
[
1] We showed in the
previous chapter
that the divine law which makes
men truly happy and teaches the true life, is universal to all men. We also
deduced that law from human nature in such a way that it must itself be
deemed innate to the human mind and, so to speak, inscribed upon it. As
for ceremonies, or those at least which are narrated in the Old Testament,
these were instituted for the Hebrews alone and were so closely accom-
modated to their state that in the main they could be practised not by
individuals but only by the community as a whole. It is certain, therefore,
that they do not belong to the divine law and hence contribute nothing
to happiness and virtue. They are relevant only to the election of the
Hebrews, that is (as we showed in chapter
3
), to the temporal and material
prosperity and peace of their state, and therefore could have relevance only
so long as that state survived. If in the Old Testament they are ascribed to
the law of God, that is only because they were instituted as the result of a
revelation or on revealed foundations. But since reasoning, no matter how
sound, carries little weight with ordinary theologians, I propose now to
adduce the authority of the Bible to con¢rm what I have just proved.Then,
for yet greater clarity, I will show why and how these ceremonies served to
establish and preserve the Jewish state.
[
2] Isaiah teaches nothing more clearly than that the divine law in an
absolute sense signi¢es, not ceremonies, but that universal law that con-
sists in the true conception of living. At
1.10 the prophet summons his
68


people to hear the divine law from him. First he excludes all kinds of
sacri¢ces and feast-days, and then proclaims the law itself (verses
16
and
17), summing it up in these few points: purity of mind, a disposition
or habit of virtue or good actions, and giving help to the poor. Equally
lucid is the testimony of verses
7^9 of Psalm 40, where the Psalmist says
to God: ‘Sacri¢ce and o¡ering you did
70
not wish, you have opened
1
your
ears to me, you have not sought a holocaust and an o¡ering for sin;
I have sought to carry out your will, O God; for your law is in my
entrails’. Thus he applies the term ‘law of God’ only to what is inscribed
in the entrails or heart, and excludes ceremonies from it; for ceremonies
are good only by convention and not by nature, and therefore are not
inscribed in the heart. Other passages in Scripture testify to the same
thing, but it is enough to refer to these two.
[
3] It is also evident from Scripture itself that ceremonies contribute
nothing to happiness, but are only relevant to the temporal prosperity of
the state. Scripture promises nothing but material pleasures and advan-
tages in return for ceremonies, whereas it promises happiness only for
obedience to the universal divine law. In the Five Books which are com-
monly called the books of Moses, nothing is promised, as we noted
above, other than this worldly well-being which is honour or fame, vic-
tory, wealth, pleasure and health. Although these Five Books contain
much about morality as well as ceremonies, morality is not to be found
there as moral teachings universal to all men, but only as instructions
uniquely adjusted to the understanding and character of the Hebrew
nation, and therefore relevant to the prosperity of their state alone. For
example, it is not as a teacher or a prophet that Moses requires the Jews
not to kill or steal; he decrees it as a legislator and prince. For he does
not ground his teachings on reason, but rather attaches a penalty to his
commands, and punishment can and should vary according to the char-
acter of each nation, as experience has taught well enough.
Equally, the commandment not to commit adultery relates only to the
interest of the commonwealth and the state. If he had wanted to give moral
instruction that would relate not only to the needs of the state but also the
peace of mind and true happiness of each individual, then he would con-
demn not only the external act but also the consent of the mind itself, as
1
Spinoza’s footnote: This is an expression that signi¢es perception.
On ceremonies and narratives
69


Christ did, who taught only universal truths (see Matthew
5.28). This is
the reason why Christ promises a spiritual reward, not like Moses a
physical one; for Christ, as I said, was sent not to conserve a common-
wealth and institute laws, but to
71
teach the universal law alone. Hence, we
readily understand that Christ did not abolish the Law of Moses at all, since
he did not intend to introduce any new laws into the state. His overriding
concern was to o¡er moral teaching, and to distinguish it from the laws of
the state, and this he did chie£y due to the ignorance of the Pharisees
who supposed that man lived well by defending the laws of the state, or the
Law of Moses, despite the fact that this Law, as we have said, related only to
the state and sought to compel rather than instruct the Hebrews.
[
4] But let us return to our subject, and o¡er other passages of Scripture
a¡ording nothing but material advantages in reward for ceremonies while
promising happiness for adherence to the divine universal law alone. None
of the prophets has taught this more clearly than Isaiah. In chapter
58,
2
after condemning hypocrisy, Isaiah commends liberation [of the oppres-
sed] and charity towards oneself and one’s neighbour and, in return, makes
this promise: ‘Then shall your light break forth as the dawn, and your
healing shall speedily £ower, and your justice shall go before you, and the
glory of God shall gather you’,
3
etc. After this he also commends the sab-
bath, and as a reward for diligent observance promises this: ‘Then you
shall have joy with God,
4
and I will make you ride
5
upon the heights of the
earth, so that you may feed upon the heritage of Jacob your father, as the
mouth of Jehovah has spoken’.
6
Thus we see that the prophet promises as the reward for liberating [the
oppressed] and practising charity, a healthy mind in a healthy body
7
and
the glory of God after death, but the reward for ceremonies is merely the
security of the state, prosperity, and worldly success. In Psalms
15 and 24
no mention is made of ceremonies, but only of moral teaching, evidently
because in these psalms only happiness is proposed and o¡ered, albeit in
¢gurative language. For it is certain that in these psalms the ‘mountain of
2
See Isaiah
58:1^9.
3
Spinoza’s footnote: A Hebrew idiom, by which the time of death is signi¢ed; ‘to be gathered to one’s
people’ means ‘to die’: see Genesis
49.29, 33.
4
Spinoza’s footnote: This means to enjoy honestly, just as also in Dutch, ‘met Godt en met eere’
[‘with God and with honour’].
5
Spinoza’s footnote: This signi¢es governance, as in restraining a horse by the bridle.
6
Isaiah
58.14.
7
Juvenal, Satires,
10.356.
Theological-Political Treatise
70




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə