Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə49/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   ...   114

rather than in following the teachings of the Holy Spirit. Far from con-
sisting of love, it has been turned, under the false labels of holy devotion
and ardent zeal, into the promotion of con£ict and dissemination of
senseless hatred.
These bad things have been aggravated by superstition, which teaches
people to despise reason, and nature, and revere and venerate only such
things as con£ict with these
98
both. So it is hardly surprising that to
enhance their admiration and reverence for scripture, men seek to inter-
pret it in such a way that it seems to con£ict altogether with reason and
with nature. They imagine that the most profound mysteries are hidden
in Holy Scripture and put all their energy into investigating these absurd
issues while neglecting other matters which are useful.The fantasies they
come up with they ascribe to the Holy Spirit, attempting to defend them
with all the force and power of their passions. For this is how human
beings are constructed: whatever they conceive purely with their intel-
lects, they also defend purely with intellect and reason while, on the
other hand, whatever opinions they derive from their passions, they
defend with their passions.
[
2] To extricate ourselves from such confusion and to free our minds
from theological prejudices and the blind acceptance of human ¢ctions
as God’s teaching, we need to analyse and discuss the true method of
interpreting Scripture. For if we do not know this, we can know nothing
for certain regarding what the Bible or the Holy Spirit wishes to teach.To
formulate the matter succinctly, I hold that the method of interpreting
Scripture, does not di¡er from the [correct] method of interpreting
nature, but rather is wholly consonant with it. The [correct] method of
interpreting nature consists above all in constructing a natural history,
from which we derive the de¢nitions of natural things, as from certain
data. Likewise, to interpret Scripture, we need to assemble a genuine
history of it and to deduce the thinking of the Bible’s authors by valid
inferences from this history, as from certain data and principles.
Provided we admit no other criteria or data for interpreting Scripture
and discussing its contents than what is drawn from Scripture itself
and its history, we will always proceed without any danger of going
astray, and we shall have the same assuredness in discussing things that
surpass our understanding as in discussing things that we learn by the
natural light of reason.
Theological-Political Treatise
98


[
3] But in order to be perfectly clear that this method is not only the sure
way but also the only way, and is consistent with the method of interpret-
ing nature, we should note that the Bible is very often concerned with
things that cannot be deduced from principles known by the natural light
of reason. For the greater part of it is composed of historical narratives and
revelations. In particular, these histories
99
contain miracles, that is (as we
showed in the
previous chapter
), narratives of things unknown to nature
adapted to the beliefs and judgments of the chroniclers who compiled
them. Revelations likewise are adjusted to the beliefs of the prophets, as we
showed in the
second chapter
, and really do transcend human under-
standing. Consequently, knowledge of all these things, that is, of almost
everything in Scripture, must be sought from the Bible itself, just as
knowledge of nature has to be sought from nature itself.
[
4] As for the moral teachings contained in the Bible, these can indeed
be demonstrated from general concepts, but it cannot be demonstrated
from general concepts that Scripture teaches them; this can only be made
evident from Scripture itself. In fact, if we want to attest the divine char-
acter of Scripture objectively, we must establish from the Bible alone that it
o¡ers true moral doctrines. This is the only ground on which its divine
character can be proven. For we have shown that this is principally what the
assurance of the prophets derived from, that their minds were attuned to
the right and the good; and this is what we need to be convinced of our-
selves, if we are to have con¢dence in them. We have also already proven
that God’s divinity cannot be attested by miracles, not to mention the fact
that miracles could also be performed by false prophets. Hence, the divine
character of the Bible must needs be established by this one thing alone,
that it teaches true virtue, something which can only be established from
Scripture itself.Were this not the case, we could not acknowledge the Bible
and its divine character without massively prejudging the issue. All of our
knowledge of the Bible, hence, must be derived only from the Bible itself.
Finally, Scripture does not o¡er de¢nitions of the things which it speaks of,
any more than does nature. Such de¢nitions must be drawn from the var-
ious narratives about di¡erent things in Scripture just as de¢nitions of
natural things are deduced from the di¡erent actions of nature.
[
5] The universal rule then for interpreting Scripture is to claim nothing
as a biblical doctrine that we have not derived, by the closest possible
On the interpretation of Scripture
99


scrutiny, from its own [i.e. the Bible’s] history.
1
What sort of thing a
history of Scripture needs to be and what are the principal things it must
deal with have now to be explained.
(
1) Firstly, such a history must include the nature and properties of the
language in which the biblical books were composed and which their authors
were accustomed to speak. We can
100
then investigate all the possible meanings
that every single phrase in common usage can admit; and because all the
writers of both the Old and the New Testament were Hebrews undeniably
the history of the Hebrew language is more essential than anything else not
only for understanding the books of the Old Testament which were ¢rst writ-
ten in this language, but also those of the New Testament. For while the latter
were propagated in other languages, they are full of Hebrew idioms.
(
2) [Such a history] must gather together the opinions expressed in each
individual book and organize them by subject so that we may have available
by this means all the statements that are found on each topic. We should then
make note of any that are ambiguous or obscure or seem to contradict others.
By obscure expressions I mean those whose sense is di⁄cult to elicit from
the context of a passage while those whose meaning is readily elicited I call
clear. I am not now speaking of how easily or otherwise their truth is grasped
by reason; for we are concerned here only with their meaning, not with their
truth. Moreover, in seeking the sense of Scripture we must take care
especially not to be blinded by our own reasoning, in so far as it is founded
on the principles of natural knowledge (not to mention our preconceptions).
In order not to confuse the genuine sense of a passage with the truth of
things, we must investigate a passage’s sense only from its use of the
language or from reasoning which accepts no other foundation than Scripture
itself.
To make all this more clearly understood, I will give an example. Moses’
statements, ‘God is ¢re’ and ‘God is jealous’ are as plain as possible so long
as we attend exclusively to the meaning of the words, and therefore I class
them as clear expressions, even though, with respect to truth and reason,
they are exceedingly obscure. Moreover even though their literal sense con-
£icts with the natural light of reason, unless it is also clearly in con£ict with
the principles and fundamentals derived from investigating the history of
Scripture we must still stick to this, the literal sense. Conversely, if
the literal sense of these expressions is found to con£ict with the principles
drawn from Scripture, even if they are fully in agreement with reason, they
will nevertheless need to be interpreted di¡erently (i.e., metaphorically).
1
Ex ipsius historia.
Theological-Political Treatise
100




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə