Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə46/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   ...   114

This is why the Jews and all who adopted their notion of God’s providence
only from the varying condition of human a¡airs and men’s unequal for-
tunes, persuaded themselves that the Israelites were dearer to God than
other men, even though they did not surpass other men in human per-
fection, as we showed above in chapter
3
.
[
12] (3) I now turn to my third point:
89
I will show from Scripture that the
edicts and commands of God, and hence of providence, are nothing other
than the order of nature. That is, when the Bible says that this or that was
done by God or by the will of God, it simply means that it was done
according to the laws and order of nature, and not, as most people think,
that nature ceased to operate for a time or that its order was brie£y inter-
rupted. But the Bible does not directly teach things which do not concern
its doctrine; nor is it its intention (as we have already shown with regard to
divine law) to explain things by natural causes or teach purely philosophi-
cal things. Consequently our point has to be derived by inference from
certain narratives in Scripture which, as it happens, are given at some
length and in considerable detail. I will cite some of them.
[
13] 1 Samuel 9.15^16 tells us that God revealed to Samuel that he would
send Saul to him. But God did not send Saul to him as human beings are
accustomed to send one man to another; this sending by God occurred
simply according to the order of nature. Saul was searching (as is men-
tioned in the
previous chapter
) for the asses he had lost, and at last, as he
was wondering whether to return home without them, his servant advised
him to approach the prophet Samuel, so as to learn from him where he
could ¢nd them. Nowhere in the story is it evident that Saul received any
other command from God apart from this natural procedure of
approaching Samuel. In Psalm
105.24 it is stated that God turned the
hearts of the Egyptians to hate the Israelites; this too was a natural
change, as emerges from the
¢rst chapter
of Exodus which reports the
urgent reason that motivated the Egyptians to reduce the Israelites to
slavery. At Genesis
9.13 God informs Noah that he will put a rainbow in
the clouds. This action of God’s is assuredly no other than the refraction
and re£ection a¡ecting sun rays seen through drops of water. At Psalm
147.18 the natural action and heat of the wind by which frost and snow
are melted is termed the word of God, and in verse
15 wind and cold are
called the utterance and word of God. In Psalm
104.4 wind and ¢re are
On miracles
89


styled the the envoys and ministers of God, and there are many other
things in the Bible to this e¡ect, showing very clearly that the decree of
God, his command, his utterance, his word are nothing other than the
very action and order of nature
90
. Without doubt, therefore, everything
narrated in Scripture actually happened naturally, and yet it is all ascri-
bed to God, since it is not the intention of the Bible, as we have shown,
to explain things in terms of natural causes but only to speak of things
that commonly occupy people’s imaginations, and to do so in a manner
and style calculated to inspire wonder about things and thus impress
devotion upon the minds of the common people.
[
14] Consequently, if we ¢nd certain things in the Bible for which we
cannot attribute a cause, and which seem to have occurred beyond or
even contrary to the order of nature, these things should not represent a
problem for us; rather we should be fully persuaded that whatever really
happened, happened naturally. This is also con¢rmed by the fact that
some of the details of miracles are sometimes omitted in the telling,
especially in a poetic narrative. These details of such miracles, however,
plainly show that they involve natural causes. For instance, in order for
the Egyptians to be a¥icted with boils, it was necessary for Moses to
throw ashes up into the air (see Exodus
9.10). The locusts reached the
land of Egypt by a natural command of God, namely by means of a wind
from the east that blew for a whole day and a night; later they left because
of a very strong wind from the west (see Exodus
10.14, 19). It was by the
same command of God that the sea opened up a path for the Jews (see
Exodus
14.1), namely because of an east wind that blew very strongly
for a whole night. To raise the boy who was believed to be dead, Elisha
needed to lie over him for some time, until he ¢rst grew warm and
¢nally opened his eyes (see
2 Kings 4.34^35). Lastly, in the Gospel of
John ch.
9
, circumstances are mentioned of which Christ made use to
heal the blind man. We ¢nd many other things in Scripture which all
evidently show that miracles require something other than what is
called the absolute command of God. This is also clear from Exodus
14.27, where it is merely stated that the sea rose again, at a mere ges-
ture from Moses, and there is no mention of any wind whereas, in the
Song of Songs (
15.10), we learn that it happened because God blew
with his wind (i.e., with a very strong wind); this detail is omitted in the
¢rst telling, and owing to that
91
it appears to be a greater miracle.
Theological-Political Treatise
90


[
15] Yet someone may perhaps object that we ¢nd a whole host of
things in Scripture which do not seem capable of being explained by
natural causes at all, for example, that men’s sins and prayers can be a
cause of rain or of the earth’s fertility, or that faith can heal the blind,
and other things of this sort narrated in the Bible. But I think I have
already answered this; for I showed that Scripture does not explain
things by their immediate causes, but rather relates things in a style
and language that will encourage devotion, especially among the com-
mon people. For this reason, it speaks in a wholly inexact manner about
God and things precisely because it is not seeking to sway men’s reason
but to in£uence and captivate their fancy and imagination. For if
Scripture related the destruction of an empire in the way political his-
torians do, it would not appeal to the common people; but it is very
appealing to them when everything is narrated poetically and all things
are ascribed to God, as the Bible normally does. When therefore
Scripture says that the earth was sterile due to men’s sins, or that blind
men were healed by faith, it should move us no more than when it says
that God is angry or saddened by men’s sins or repents of a promise or
favour he has given, or that God remembers his promise because he
sees a sign ^ and a whole host of other things which are either
expressed poetically or have been related according to the author’s
beliefs and preconceptions.
Thus, we conclude without reservation that all things that are truly
reported to have happened in Scripture necessarily happened according to
the laws of nature, as all things do. If anything is found which can be
demonstrated conclusively to contradict the laws of nature or which could
not possibly to follow from them, we must accept in every case that it was
interpolated into the Bible by blasphemous persons. For whatever is con-
trary to nature, is contrary to reason, and what is contrary to reason, is
absurd, and accordingly to be rejected.
[
16] (4) It remains only to make a few remarks about the interpretation
of miracles, or rather to recapitulate these (for the major points of this
have already been given), and illustrate them with one or two examples, as
I promised to do here as my fourth goal. I need to do this, so that no one
giving a defective interpretation of some miracle, will leap to the unfoun-
ded conclusion that he has hit on something in Scripture that does con-
tradict the light of nature.
On miracles
91




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə