Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə45/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   ...   114

more clearly understand how they depend on their ¢rst cause and how
they behave according to the eternal laws of nature. From the perspective
of our understanding, hence, we have much more right to term those
phenomena which we understand clearly and distinctly works of God
and attribute them to the will of God, than works of which we are wholly
ignorant, however strongly they grip the imagination and make us mar-
vel. For it is only the phenomena
86
of nature we understand clearly and
distinctly that enhance our knowledge of God and reveal as clearly as
possible the will and decrees of God. Therefore, those who have recourse
to the will of God when they are ignorant of something are clearly talking
nonsense: what a ridiculous way to acknowledge one’s ignorance!
[
8] Furthermore, even if we could draw conclusions from miracles, we
certainly could not derive [from them] the existence of God. Given that a
miracle is a limited phenomenon, and never reveals anything more than a
¢xed and limited power, it is certain that from such an e¡ect we cannot
infer the existence of a cause whose power is in¢nite, but at most a cause
whose power is fairly large. I say ‘at most’, for a phenomenon may also fol-
low from several simultaneously concurring causes whose force and power
is less than the power of all these causes together but much greater than
that of each individual cause. Whereas the laws of nature (as we have
already shown) extend to in¢nity, and are conceived by us as having some-
thing of the character of eternity and nature proceeds according to them in
a ¢xed and unalterable order, so that they themselves to that extent give us
some indication of the in¢nity, eternity and immutability of God.
We therefore conclude that we cannot come to know God and his exis-
tence and providence from miracles, the former being much better infer-
red from the ¢xed and unalterable order of nature. In reaching this
conclusion I am speaking of a miracle understood simply as a phenomenon
which surpasses, or is thought to surpass, human understanding. For in so
far as it is conceived to destroy or interrupt the order of nature or con£ict
with its laws, to that extent (as we have just shown) not only would it give us
no knowledge of God, it would actually take away the knowledge we natu-
rally have and make us doubt about God and all things.
[
9] Neither do I acknowledge any di¡erence between a phenomenon
which is contrary to nature and a phenomenon which is above nature
(i.e., as some de¢ne it, a phenomenon that does not con£ict with nature
Theological-Political Treatise
86


but cannot to be made or produced by it).
5
For since a miracle does not
occur outside of nature but within nature itself, even if it is said to be above
nature, it must still necessarily interrupt the order of nature which other-
wise we conceive to be ¢xed and unalterable by God’s decrees. If therefore
something happened in nature which did not follow from its laws, this
would necessarily con£ict with the order
87
that God established in nature for
ever by the universal laws of nature; it would hence be contrary to nature
and its laws and, consequently, it would make us doubt our faith in all
things and lead us to atheism.
Hence, I think that I have proved with su⁄ciently strong arguments the
second point that I proposed to discuss, and thus we may conclude again
on additional grounds that a miracle, whether contrary to nature or above
nature, is a plain absurdity. Therefore, the only thing that we can under-
stand by a miracle in Holy Scripture is, as I have said, a phenomenon of
nature that surpasses human understanding, or is believed to do so.
[
10] Now, before turning to my third point, I should like ¢rst to con-
¢rm my claim that we cannot achieve a knowledge of God from miracles
with Scripture’s authority. Even though Scripture nowhere explicitly tells
us this, it may readily be inferred, especially from the command of
Moses in Deuteronomy
13 to condemn a false prophet to death even if
he performs miracles. He says: (even though) ‘the sign and the wonder
that he foretold to you shall come to pass, etc., do not’ (nevertheless)
‘listen to the words of that prophet, etc., for the Lord your God is testing
you’, etc. It plainly follows from this that miracles can also be performed
by false prophets, and that unless men are duly strengthened by a true
knowledge and love of God, they may just as easily embrace false gods as
a consequence of miracles as the true God; for he adds: ‘since Jehovah
your God is testing you so as to know whether you love him with all your
heart and with all your soul’. The Israelites, moreover, were unable to
form a sound conception of God despite all those miracles, as experience
itself testi¢ed. For when they were convinced Moses was away, they asked
Aaron for visible gods, and the idea of God which they ¢nally arrived at
5
It was basic to Spinoza’s system that nothing can be postulated to be ‘above’ nature or ‘above’
reason which is not also ‘contrary to nature’ and ‘contrary to reason’; in this he is closely followed
by Bayle but directly opposed by Locke, Leibniz and Malebranche, who all accept the principle
that there are ‘mysteries’above reason and ‘above nature’ which, however, are not contrary to nature
or to reason.
On miracles
87


as a result of so many miracles was a calf. This was shameful! Asaph
despite having heard of so many miracles, nevertheless still doubted
God’s providence and would have turned from the true path had he not
¢nally understood the true happiness (see Psalm
73). Solomon too, in
whose time the a¡airs of the Jews were at their most £ourishing, suspects
all things happen by chance: see Ecclesiastes
3:19^21, 9:2^3 etc. Finally, it
was thoroughly obscure to most
88
prophets how the order of nature and
human a¡airs was consistent with the conception of God’s providence
which they had formed. However, this was always entirely clear to the
philosophers who seek to understand things not from miracles but from
clear concepts, or at any rate to those [philosophers] who place true
happiness in virtue and peace of mind alone, and do not attempt to make
nature obey them but rather strive to obey nature themselves. They have
certain knowledge that God directs nature not as the particular laws of
human nature urge but as its universal laws require and, hence, that God
takes account not just of the human race but of nature in its entirety.
[
11] It is thus also evident from Scripture itself that miracles do not
yield true knowledge of God and do not clearly demonstrate the provi-
dence of God. The incidents frequently encountered in the Bible where
God performs wonders to make himself known to men (as in Exodus
10.2 where God deceived the Egyptians and gave signs of himself so that
the Israelites might know that he was God), do not show that the mira-
cles really proved this; they only show that the beliefs of the Jews were
such that they could readily be convinced by these miracles. We clearly
proved above in chapter
2
that prophetic arguments, or arguments
derived from revelation, are not drawn from universal and basic concepts
but from the preconceptions and beliefs, no matter how absurd, of those
to whom the revelations are made or whom the holy spirit seeks to con-
vince. We illustrated this by many examples and by the testimony of Paul,
who was a Greek to the Greeks and a Jew to the Jews.
While these miracles could persuade the Egyptians and Hebrews
because of their prior beliefs, yet they could not yield any true idea and
knowledge of God. Miracles could only bring them to acknowledge that
there is a deity more powerful than all things known to them, and that he
watched over the Hebrews, for whom at that point in time everything had
succeeded beyond their expectations. Miracles could not demonstrate to
them that God cares equally for all men: only philosophy can teach this.
Theological-Political Treatise
88




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə