Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə30/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   ...   114

[
20] This discussion of prophets and prophecy is highly relevant to the
purpose which I have in view, namely to separate philosophy from
theology. But now that I have entered in a general way on the subject, it is
best to inquire at this point whether the prophetic gift was peculiar only
to the Hebrews or common to all nations, and what we are to think of the
‘vocation’ of the Hebrews. About all this, see the following chapter.
Theological-Political Treatise
42


chapter 3
On the vocation of the Hebrews, and whether the
prophetic gift was peculiar to them
[
1] True joy and happiness lie in the simple enjoyment of what is good
and not in the kind of false pride that enjoys happiness because others are
excluded from it. Anyone who thinks that he is happy because his situation
is better than other people’s or because he is happier and more fortunate
than they, knows nothing of true happiness and joy, and the pleasure he
derives from his attitude is either plain silly or spiteful and malicious. For
example, a person’s true joy and felicity lie solely in his wisdom and
knowledge of truth, not in being wiser than others or in others’ being
without knowledge of truth, since this does not increase his own wisdom
which is his true felicity. Anyone therefore who takes pleasure in that way is
enjoying another’s misfortune, and to that extent is envious and malign,
and does not know true wisdom or the peace of the true life.
When therefore Scripture states that God chose the Hebrews for
himself above other nations (see Deuteronomy
10.15) so as to encourage
them to obey the law, and is near to them and not to others (Deuter-
onomy
4.4^7), and has laid down good laws solely for them and not for
others (Deuteronomy
4.2), and has made himself known to them alone,
in preference to others (see Deuteronomy
4.32), and so on, Scripture is
merely speaking according to their understanding. As we showed in the
last chapter
, and as Moses also testi¢es
45
(see Deuteronomy
9.6^7), theydid
not know true happiness. They would certainly have been no less felici-
tous if God had called all men equally to salvation; and God would not be
less gracious to them for being equally good to others. Their laws would
not have been less just, nor they themselves less wise, even if those laws
43


had been prescribed to all men. Their miracles would not display the
power of God any less, if they had also been performed for other nations;
nor would the Hebrews be less obliged to worship God, had he equally
bestowed these gifts on all men. God’s remark to Solomon (see
1 Kings
3.12) that no one who came after him would be as wise as he is, seems to
be merely an expression with which to stress his outstanding wisdom. In
any case, one cannot believe that God promised him that he would not
give as much happiness to anyone else after him, in order to make Solomon
happier. For this would not in any way enhance Solomon’s understanding,
and had God said he would give the same wisdom to everybody, that wise
king would not have shown less gratitude to God for so great a gift.
[
2] Even so, though we say that Moses in the passages just cited from
the Pentateuch spoke according to the understanding of the Hebrews, we
do not mean to deny that God prescribed the laws of the Pentateuch to
them alone or that he spoke only to them or that the Hebrews saw
wonders that occurred to no other nation. We mean rather that Moses
desired to teach the Hebrews in such a manner and inculcate into them
such principles as would attach them more closely to the worship of
God on the basis of their childish understanding. We also wanted to
show that the Hebrews excelled other nations neither in knowledge nor
piety but in something quite di¡erent, or (to speak in terms of Scripture,
according to their understanding) that the Hebrews were chosen above
others by God not, despite their being frequently admonished, with a
view to the true life and elevated conceptions but rather for something
completely di¡erent. What this was, I will show here directly.
[
3] But before I begin, I want to explain in a few words what I mean in
what follows by ‘God’s direction’, by ‘God’s external and internal help’, by
‘divine election’, and ¢nally what I mean by ‘fortune’. By ‘God’s direction’,
I mean the ¢xed and unalterable order of nature or the interconnectedness
of [all] natural things. We have shown
46
above, and have previously demon-
strated elsewhere,
1
that the universal laws of nature according to which all
things happen and are determined, are nothing other than the eternal
1
I.e., in the Cogitata metaphysica, the
47-page text published by Spinoza, under his own name, as a
supplement to his geometrical exposition of the principles of Descartes’ philosophy, entitled
Renati Des Cartes, Principiorum philosophiae pars I & II, more geometrico demonstrata (Amsterdam,
1663).
Theological-Political Treatise
44


decrees of God and always involve truth and necessity. Whether therefore
we say that all things happen according to the laws of nature, or are
ordained by the edict and direction of God, we are saying the same thing.
Likewise, as the power of all natural things together is nothing other than
the very power of God by which alone all things happen, it follows that
whatever a man, who is also part of nature, does for himself in order to
preserve his being, or whatever nature o¡ers him without any action on his
part, is all given to him by divine power alone, acting either through
human nature or through things external to human nature. Whatever
therefore human nature can supply from its own resources to preserve
man’s own being, we may rightly call the ‘internal assistance of God’, and
whatever proves useful to man from the power of external causes, that we
may properly term the ‘external assistance of God’.
We can readily conclude from this what we are to understand by ‘God’s
election’. For given that nobody does anything except by the pre-
determined order of nature, that is, by the eternal decree and direction of
God, it follows that no one chooses any way of life for himself nor brings
anything about, except via the particular summons of God, who chose this
man in preference to others for this task or that way of life. Finally, by
‘fortune’ I understand nothing other than the direction of God inasmuch
as he governs human a¡airs through external and unforeseen causes.
[
4] After these preliminaries let us return to our theme in order to see
why it was that the Hebrew nation was said to be chosen by God above
others. To show this, I proceed as follows.
[
5] All things whichwe honestly desire may be reduced to three principal
categories:
(i)
to understand things through their primary causes
(ii)
to control the passions, that is to acquire the habit of virtue
(iii) and, lastly, to live securely and in good health.
The means which lead directly to the attainment of the ¢rst and second
goals and which may be considered as their immediate and e⁄cient cau-
ses, are to be found in human nature itself, so that their attainment
depends chie£y on our own capabilities, that is, on the laws of human
nature alone. Accordingly, it may be categorically asserted that these gifts
On the vocation of the Hebrews
45




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə