Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3.08 Kb.

səhifə27/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3.08 Kb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   114

all remained obscure, because there was no one at that time who had such a
powerful imagination that it could be revealed to him more clearly. Finally,
the prophets to whom it was revealed that God would take Elijah away
attempted to persuade Elisha that he had been taken to some other place
where they might still ¢nd him; this plainly shows that they had not
properly understood God’s revelation.
5
[
12] I need not press this point further, for nothing is clearer in Scrip-
ture than that God granted some prophets a far greater gift of prophecy
than others. But I will demonstrate more precisely and more fully that
prophecies or revelations also varied according to the beliefs which the
prophets had embraced, and that prophets held di¡erent, or even incom-
patible, beliefs from one another and had di¡erent preconceptions. (I am
speaking about purely philosophical questions here; we must take a very
di¡erent view of anything relating to uprightness and good conduct.)
I think this question is of major importance, for I ultimately conclude
from it that prophecy never made the prophets more learned, but left
them with their preconceived beliefs and that, for this reason, we are in
no way obliged to believe them in purely philosophical matters.
[
13] It is astounding how readily all the commentators have embraced
the notion that the prophets knew everything that human understanding
can attain. Even though certain passages of the Bible tell us in the plainest
terms that there were some things the prophets did not know, the [com-
mentators] prefer either to say that they do not understand the sense of
Scripture in these passages or attempt to twist the words to make it say
what it plainly does not, rather than admit that the prophets were ignorant
of anything. Obviously if we take either course, Scripture has no more
meaning for us; if we may regard the clearest passages as obscure and
impenetrable or interpret them in any way we please, it will be pointless to
try to prove anything from it at all.
For example, nothing in the Bible is clearer than that Joshua, and per-
haps the author who wrote his history, thought that the sun moves round
the earth and the earth is at rest and the
36
sun stood still for a period of time.
Some are unwilling to allow that there can be any change in the heavens
and hence interpret this passage in such a way that it will not seem to say
5
2 Kings 2.15^18.
On the prophets
33


anything like that. Others who have learnt to philosophize more accurately
and recognize that the earth moves and the sun is at rest, or does not move
around the earth, make great e¡orts to derive this from this passage even
though it obviously will not permit such a reading. I am really astonished at
them. Are we obliged, I ask, to believe that Joshua, a soldier, was an expert
in astronomy and that a miracle could not be revealed to him, or that the
light of the sun could not be above the horizon longer than usual, without
Joshua understanding the cause of it? Both explanations seem utterly
ridiculous to me. I prefer to say frankly that Joshua was ignorant of the true
cause of that longer-lasting light. He and all the people with him believed
both that the sun moves in a daily motion around the earth and that on this
day it stood still for some time, and they believed that this was the cause of
the longer-lasting light. They had no idea that as a result of the large
amount of ice which was in the air there at that time (see Joshua
10.11),
6
there was a greater refraction than normal, or something of that kind. But
we will not go into this at the moment.
For Isaiah too
7
the sign of the shadow moving backwards was revealed to
him in a manner suited to his understanding, namely as a backward
movement of the sun, since he too thought that the sun moves and the
earth is at rest. Of parhelia he probably had not even the faintest notion.
8
We may assert this unreservedly . For the sign really might have occurred
and Isaiah might have predicted it to the king, even though he did not
know its true cause.
The same must also be said for Solomon’s building of the Temple, if
indeed that was revealed by God, i.e., that all its measurements were
revealed to Solomon according to his understanding and assumptions. For
as we have no reason to believe Solomon was a mathematician, we are
entitled to assert that he did not know the true ratio between the cir-
cumference of a circle and its diameter, and supposed like most craftsmen
that it was
3 to 1. For if it is permissible to say that we do not understand
the text of
1 Kings 7.23, I simplydo not know whatwe can understand from
Scripture, since the edi¢ce is merely reported in that passage in a purely
descriptive manner. If one is permitted to claim that Scripture meant
something else here, but for some reason unknown to us it was decided to
6
‘And as they £ed before Israel, while they were going down the ascent of Beth-Horon, the Lord
threw down great stones from heaven upon them as far as Azekah, and they died; there were more
who died because of the hailstones than the men of Israel killed with the sword.’ ( Joshua
10.11).
7
Isaiah
38.7^8.
8
i.e., sundogs or mock suns.
Theological-Political Treatise
34


put it this way, the consequence is the
37
complete and utter subversion of the
whole of the Bible. Everyone will be able to say the same with equal justi-
¢cation about every single passage. It will be possible to perpetrate and
justify every absurd or malicious thing that human perversity can dream
up, without impugning the authority of Scripture. Nor does our position
involve any impiety: for Solomon, Isaiah, Joshua, etc., though prophets,
were still men, and nothing human is to be thought alien to them.
9
Like-
wise, the revelation that God was going to destroy the human race was
accommodated to the limited understanding of Noah, since he thought
that the world was uninhabited outside of Palestine.
The prophets could be ignorant of things such as these without piety
being put at risk, and not only of these but also of more important matters,
of which indeed they were truly ignorant. For they taught nothing out of
the ordinary about the divine attributes, but rather had thoroughly com-
monplace conceptions of God and their revelations were accommodated
to these notions, as I will now show by many citations from Scripture. You
will readily see from this that the reason why they are so highly praised and
commended was not for the sublimity and excellence of their intellects but
for their piety and constancy.
[
14] Adam, the ¢rst man to whom God was revealed, did not know that
God is present everywhere and is all-knowing: he hid himself from God
and attempted to excuse his o¡ence before God, as if he were dealing with a
man. Hence God was revealed to him to the extent of his understanding,
namely, as one who is not present everywhere and was ignorant of Adam’s
location and of his sin. He heard, or seemed to hear, God walking through
the garden, and calling him, and asking where he was, and then asking, as a
result of Adam’s embarrassment, whether he had eaten of the forbidden
tree.
10
Adam therefore knew only one attribute of God, that he was the
maker of all things. God was also revealed to Cain to the extent of his
understanding, namely as [seeming to be] ignorant of human a¡airs; he did
not need a more elevated conception of God to repent of his sin.
11
God
revealed himself to Laban as the God of Abraham, because Laban believed
that every nation has its own particular god: see Genesis
31.29. Abraham
too was ignorant that God is everywhere and foreknows all things. When
9
Compare Terence, Heautontimoroumenos (The Self-Tormentor)
77.
10
Genesis
3.7^13.
11
Genesis
4.9.
On the prophets
35




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə