Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise


parted from Egypt, we have already noted



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə89/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   ...   114

[
7] After the Hebrews departed from Egypt, we have already noted
above in chapter
5
, they were no longer obligated by the law of any other
nation, but it was up to them to institute new laws as they pleased and
occupy whatever lands they wanted. Once liberated from the intolerable
oppression of the Egyptians, they were not bound by compact to anyone;
rather they regained the natural right to all that they could get, and
everyone was once again free to decide whether they wanted to retain
this right or give it up and transfer it to another person. Being in this
natural state, they resolved, on the advice of Moses in whom they all had
the greatest trust, to transfer their right to no mortal man but rather to
God alone. Without hesitation, all equally with one shout promised to
obey God absolutely in all his commands, and to recognize no other law
but that which He himself conferred as law by prophetic revelation. This
undertaking or transfer of right to God was made in the same way that
we conceived above it is made in an ordinary society, whenever men
make up their minds to surrender their natural right. For they gave up
their right freely, not compelled by force or frightened by threats, and
transferred it speci¢cally to God with an agreement (see Exodus
24.7)
and an oath. In order that the agreement should be accepted and settled
without any suspicion of fraud, God made no agreement with them until
after they had experienced his astounding power, by which alone they
had been saved and by which alone
206
they could be redeemed in the future
(see Exodus
19.4^5). Believing they could be saved by God’s power alone,
they transferred to Him all their natural power of preserving themselves ^
which previously perhaps they thought they had from themselves ^ and
hence transferred all their right.
[
8] Consequently, God alone held the government of the Hebrews, and
it was thus rightly called the kingdom of God owing to the covenant, and
God was aptly called also king of the Hebrews. Hence, the enemies of
this state were the enemies of God, citizens who attempted to usurp
power were guilty of treason against God’s majesty and the laws of the
state were the laws and commands of God. For this reason, civil law in
this state and religion (which as we have shown consists solely in obedi-
ence to God) were one and the same thing. That is, religious dogmas
were not doctrines but rather laws and decrees, piety being regarded as
justice, and impiety as crime and injustice. Anyone who defected from
this religion ceased to be a citizen and for this reason alone was held to
The Hebrew state in the time of Moses
213


be an enemy, and anyone who died for religion was deemed to have died
for his country; thus, no distinction at all was made between civil law
and religion. For that reason this state could be called a theocracy, since
its citizens were bound by no law but the Law revealed by God. Even
so, the fact of the matter is that all these things were more opinion
than reality. For in reality the Hebrews retained absolutely the right of
government, as will be clear from what I am about to say: it is evident
from the manner and method by which this state was governed, which
I propose to explain here.
[
9] The Hebrews did not transfer their right to another person but
rather all gave up their right, equally, as in a democracy, crying with
one voice: ‘We will do whatever God shall say’ (making no mention of an
intermediary). It follows that they all remained perfectly equal as a result
of this agreement. The right to consult God, receive laws, and interpret
them remained equal for all, and all equally without exception retained
the whole administration of the state. This is why, on the ¢rst occasion,
they all equally approached God to hear what he wished to decree. But
in this ¢rst encounter they were so exceedingly terri¢ed and astonished
when they heard God speaking that they thought their ¢nal day had
come. Gripped by terror, they approached Moses again, saying: ‘Behold
we have heard God speaking in the ¢re, and there is no reason why we
should wish to die.This great ¢re will surely consume us. If we must again
hear the voice of God, we shall surely die.You approach therefore, and hear
all the words of our God, and
207
you’ (not God) ‘will speak to us. We shall
revere everything God tells you, and will carry it out’.
7
By proceeding thus,
they plainly abolished the ¢rst covenant and absolutely transferred their
right to consult God and interpret His edicts to Moses. For they did not
promise here, as before, to obey all that God said to them but rather
everything God would say to Moses (see Deuteronomy
5, after the Ten
Commandments,
8
and
18.15^16). Hence, Moses remained the sole maker
and interpreter of the divine laws. He was also therefore the supreme judge
whom no one else could judge and who alone among the Hebrews acted
for God, i.e., he held sovereign majesty. For he alone had the right of con-
sulting God, of transmitting God’s answers to the people and compelling
them to act on them. Alone, indeed, for if while Moses lived, anyone else
7
Deuteronomy
5.23^7; cf. also Exodus 20.18^21.
8
Deuteronomy
5.23^7.
Theological-Political Treatise
214


had attempted to make any pronouncement in God’s name, even were he a
true prophet, he would be charged with usurping the sovereign right (see
Numbers
11.28).
9
[
10] Here we should note that although the people chose Moses, they
did not possess the right to choose Moses’ successor. For no sooner had
they transferred their right of consulting God to Moses, and uncondi-
tionally promised to regard him as the divine oracle, they lost absolutely
every right and had to accept anyone whom Moses should choose as his
successor just as if chosen by God.
Now had he chosen someone to exercise the entire administration of the
state, as he had done, including the right to consult God alone in his tent,
and hence authority to make and to repeal laws, to decide about war and
peace, send ambassadors, appoint judges, choose a successor, and carry
out all the functions of supreme power, it would have been a purely mon-
archical government.The sole di¡erence would have been that, ordinarily,
monarchical power results from God’s decree with this remaining hidden
from the monarch himself, whereas in the case of that of the Hebrews, the
monarchy was in a certain manner ruled, or should have been ruled, by
God’s decree which was revealed only to the monarch. However, this dif-
ference does not diminish the dominion and right of the monarch over the
people but on the contrary increases it. In the case of both kinds of state
the people are equally subject and equally ignorant of the divine decree;
both depend upon the words of the monarch, and understand right and
wrong from him alone. But the fact that they believe all his commands
derive from revelation of God’s decree to him renders the people more, not
less, subject to him.
Moses, however, chose no such
208
successor, but rather left a form of
state to his successors that could not be called democratic, aristocratic or
monarchical, but rather theocratic. For the right to interpret the laws
and communicate God’s responses was assigned to one man while the
right and power of administering government according to the laws
interpreted by the ¢rst and the responses he communicated was given to
another. On this see Numbers
27.21.
10
So that this may be better
understood, I will provide an orderly account of the whole system of
government.
9
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
36.
10
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
37.
The Hebrew state in the time of Moses
215




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə