Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə87/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   ...   114

Since by this means the law of the state is wholly violated, it follows that
the supreme right of deciding about religion, belongs to the sovereign
power, whatever judgment he may make, since it falls to him alone to
preserve the rights of the state and to protect them both by divine and by
natural law. All men are obliged to
200
obey his decrees and commands about
religion, on the basis of the pledge given to him, which God commands to
keep scrupulously.
[
22] If those who hold the sovereign power are pagans, one of two things
follows. Either we must not make any compact with them but be willing to
su¡er death rather than transfer our right to them, or, if we have made an
agreement and transferred our right to them, we must obey them and keep
faith with them, or be compelled to do so, since by that act, we have
deprived ourselves of the power of
12
defending ourselves and our religion.
This is the case for all except he to whom God has promised, by a parti-
cular revelation, assistance against tyrants or speci¢cally granted an
exemption. Thus, among all the many Jews who were in Babylon, we see
that only three young men who did not doubt the assistance of God,
refused to obey Nebuchadnezzar.
13
The rest, except for Daniel, who was
revered by the king himself, rightly and unhesitatingly obeyed when com-
pelled to do so, re£ecting perhaps that they had been made subject to the
king by God’s decree and that the king possessed supreme power and
retained it by God’s providence. Eleazar
14
on the other hand wanted to give
an example of constancy to his own people while his country was still more
or less independent. He wanted them to follow him in bearing anything
rather than allow their right and power to be transferred to the Greeks,
and su¡er anything to avoid being forced to swear allegiance to the pagans.
The general rule, however, is con¢rmed by daily experience. Rulers of
Christian countries do not hesitate to make treaties with Turks and
pagans in order to enhance their own security. They take care, though, to
forbid those of their subjects who go and live in those countries to
assume more freedom in their religious or moral practices than has
been expressly agreed or than that government permits, something evi-
dent in the agreement mentioned earlier which the Dutch made with the
Japanese.
12
Se potentia, added by Akkerman.
13
Daniel
3.
14
2 Maccabees 6.18^31.
Foundations of the state
207


chapter 17
201
W he re it is show n that no on e c an transfe r all thing s
to the s ove re ig n p owe r, and that it is not n e ce s s ar y
to do s o ; on the characte r of the Heb rew st ate in
the t i me of Mo s e s , and in the p e r io d afte r his
de ath b efore the app oin t me n t of the king s ; on its
excelle nce , and on the re a s ons why this divin e st ate
could perish, and why it could scarcely exist
without sedition
[
1] Th e c o n c e ptuali z a t i o n o¡e re d i n t h e 
p revi o u s c h apte r
 of t h e r igh t
of sovereign powers to all things and the transfer of each person’s nat-
ural right to them, agrees quite well with practice, and practice can be
brought very close to it, yet in many respects it will always remain
merely theoretical. No one will ever be able to transfer his power and
(consequently) his right to another person in such a way that he ceases
to be a human being; and there will never be a sovereign power that
can dispose of everything just as it pleases. In vain would a sovereign
command a subject to hate someone who had made himself agreeable
by an act of kindness or to love someone who had injured him, or for-
bid him to take o¡ence at insults or free himself from fear, or many
other such things that follow necessarily from the laws of human nat-
ure. Experience itself also teaches this very clearly, I think. People have
never given up their right and transferred their power to another in
such a way that they did not fear the very persons who received their
right and power, and put the government at greater risk from its own
citizens (although bereft of their right) than from its enemies. If people
208


could be so thoroughly stripped of their natural right that they could
undertake nothing in the future
1
without the consent of the holders of
sovereign power, then certainly sovereigns could dominate their subjects
in the most violent manner. However, I believe no one would accept that.
Hence we must admit that each person retains many aspects of his right,
which therefore depend upon no one’s will but their own.
[
2] To understand more preciselyhow far the right and power of the state
extend, we should note that state power does not consist merely in com-
pelling people, through fear, but also
202
of the use of every means available to
it to ensure obedience to its edicts. It is not the reason for being obedient
that makes a subject, but obedience as such. There are numerous reasons
why someone decides to carry out the commands of a sovereign power:
fear of punishment, hope of reward, love of country or the impulse of some
other passion. Whatever their reason, they are still deciding of their own
volition, and simultaneously acting at the bidding of the sovereign power.
Just because someone does something by their own design, we should not
immediately infer that they do it of their own right and not that of the state.
Whether moved by love, or compelled by fear, to avoid some bad con-
sequence, they are always acting under their own counsel and decision.
Hence, either there is no sovereignty nor any right over subjects or else
sovereignty must necessarily extend to everything that might be e¡ective
in inducing men to submit to it. Thus whatever a subject does that com-
plies with the sovereign’s commands, whether elicited by love or forced
by fear, or whether (as is more common) from hope and fear mingled, or
reverence, a sentiment composed of mixed fear and admiration, or what-
ever motive, he still does so by right of the sovereign, not his own.
This also very clearly emerges from the fact that obedience is less a
question of an external than internal action of the mind. Hence he is most
under the dominion of another who resolves to obey every order of another
wholeheartedly. Consequently, those exert the greatest power who reign in
the hearts and minds of their subjects. By contrast, were it true that it is
those who exert the greatest power who are the most feared, then these
would surely be the subjects of tyrants, since they are very much dreaded
by the tyrants who rule over them. And while it is impossible, of course, to
control people’s minds to the same extent as their tongues, still minds too
1
Spinoza’s footnote: see Annotation
35.
The Hebrew state in the time of Moses
209




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə