Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə88/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   ...   114

are to some degree subject to the sovereign power, which has various ways
to ensure that a very large part of the people believes, loves, hates, etc.,
what the sovereign wants them to. Our conclusion from this has to be that
whilst this result does not ensue from a direct edict of the government, it
nevertheless does follow from the e¡ect of the sovereign’s power and lea-
dership, that is, by virtue of its right, as experience abundantly proves.
Thus, without any logical contradiction, we can conceive of men who
believe, love, hate, despise, or exhibit any passion whatever, owing to the
power of the state alone.
[
3] Although we can envisage a quite
203
extensive power and right of gov-
ernment, therefore, it will still never be so great that those who hold it will
exert all the power they need to do whatever they want, as I think I have
shown plainly enough. I have already said it is not my intention to show
how, despite this, a state could be formed that would be securely preserved
for ever. Rather, so as to reach my own goal, I will point out what divine
revelation formerly taught Moses in this connection, and then we shall
examine the history and vicissitudes of the Hebrews. We shall see from
their experience what particular concessions sovereign powers must make
to their subjects for the greater security and success of their state.
[
4] Durability of a state, reason and experience very clearly teach,
depends chie£y upon the loyalty of its subjects, their virtue and their
constancy in executing commands; but it is not so easy to ascertain in what
way they can be helped to keep up their loyalty and virtue consistently. Both
rulers and ruled are human, that is, beings ‘always inclined to prefer plea-
sure to toil’.
2
Anyone with any experience of the capricious mind of the
multitude almost despairs of it, as it is governed not by reason but by
passion alone, it is precipitate in everything, and very easily corrupted by
greed or good living. Each person thinks he alone knows everything and
wants everything done his way and judges a thing fair or unfair, right or
wrong, to the extent he believes it works for his own gain or loss. From
pride they condemn their equals, and will not allow themselves to be ruled
by them. Envious of a greater reputation or better fortune which are never
equal for all, they wish ill towards other men and delight in that.
2
Terence, Andria [The Woman of Andros],
77^78: ingenium est omnium hominum ab labore proclive
ad lubidinem ‘human nature being always inclined to prefer pleasure to toil’ (Terence,The Woman of
Andros, The Self-Tormentor,The Eunuch, ed. and trans. John Barsby (Cambridge, MA,
2001)).
Theological-Political Treatise
210


There is no need to survey all of this here, as everyone knows what
wrongdoing people are often moved to commit because they cannot stand
their present situation and desire a major upheaval, how blind anger and
resentment of their poverty prompt men to act, and how much these
things occupy and agitate their minds. To anticipate all this and construct
a state that a¡ords no opportunity for trouble-making, to organize every-
thing in such a way that each person, of whatever character, prefers
public right to private advantage, this is the real task, this the arduous
work.
3
The necessity for this has compelled people to seek many strata-
gems. But they have never succeeded in devising a form of government
that was not in greater danger from its own citizens than from foreign foes,
and which was not more fearful
204
of the former than of the latter.
[
5] An example of this is the Roman state, wholly undefeated by its
enemies, but so often overwhelmed and wretchedly oppressed by its own
citizens, especially in the civil war of Vespasian against Vitellius; on this
see Tacitus, at the beginning of book
4 of the Histories, where he paints a
most miserable picture of the city. Alexander, more simply, (as Curtius
says at the end of book
8) rested his reputation on his enemies’ judgment
rather than that of his own citizens, believing his greatness could be
more readily ruined by his own men, etc.
4
Fearing his fate, he makes this
prayer to his friends: ‘Only keep me safe from internal treachery and the
plots of my court, and I will face without fear the dangers of war and
battle. Philip was safer in the battle line than in the theatre; he often
escaped the violence of the enemy, he could not avoid that of his own
citizens. Look at the ends of other kings, you will ¢nd that they were
more often killed by their own people than by the foe’ (see Quintus
Curtius,
9.6).
5
[
6] This is why in the past kings who usurped power tried to persuade
their people they were descended from the immortal gods, their motive
surely being to enhance their own security. They evidently believed their
subjects would willingly allow themselves to be ruled by them and readily
submit only if their subjects and everyone else regarded them not as
equals but as gods. Thus, Augustus persuaded the Romans that he
3
Virgil, Aeneid,
6.129.
4
Quintus Curtius, History of Alexander,
8.14.46.
5
Quintus Curtius, History of Alexander,
9.6.25^6.
The Hebrew state in the time of Moses
211


derived his origin from Aeneas, the son of Venus and one of the gods.
‘He wanted to be worshipped in temples with statues of himself as a god
and with £amens and priests’ (Tacitus, Annals, bk.
1).
6
Alexander wished
to be hailed as son of Jupiter which he seemingly did from policy rather
than pride, as his response to the invective of Hermolaus indicates. ‘It
was almost ridiculous’, he says,‘what Hermolaus demanded of me, that I
should argue with Jupiter, whose oracle acknowledged me. Are the gods’
responses also in my power? Jupiter o¡ered me the name of ‘‘son’’; to
accept this did no harm [N.B.] to our enterprise. Would that the Indians
too believed me to be a god! Wars hinge upon reputation; often a false
belief has had the same e¡ect as the truth’ (Curtius,
8.8). With these few
words he cleverly seeks to persuade ignorant men to accept his pretence
while at the same time indicating the reason for it. Cleon too did this in
the speech in which he tried to convince the Macedonians to humour
the king. After lending some semblance of truth to the pretence by
singing Alexander’s praises and recounting his merits in tones of
admiration, he passes in this way
205
to the usefulness of the strategy: ‘the
Persians worshipped their kings as gods not merely from piety but also
from policy, for the majesty of the state is the preservation of security’,
and concludes, ‘that when the king entered the banqueting-hall, he
himself would prostrate his body to the ground. Others should do the
same, especially those who are gifted with good sense’ (see
8.5 of the
same book).
But the Macedonians were too sensible [to do the like] and it is only
where men become wholly barbarous that they allow themselves to be
so openly deceived and become slaves useless to themselves rather than
subjects. Others, though, have been more easily able to persuade people
that majesty is sacred and ful¢ls the role of God on earth and has been
instituted by God rather than by the consent and agreement of men,
and is preserved and defended by a special providence and divine
assistance. Likewise, monarchs have devised other stratagems of this
sort for preserving their states, but I will omit them so as ¢nally to get
on to the topics I want to deal with. I will just note and discuss, as
I undertook to do, the stratagems divine revelation formerly taught
Moses.
6
Tacitus, Annals,
1.10.6: ‘se templis et e⁄gie numinum per £amines et sacerdotes coli vellet’.
Spinoza quotes these words exactly.
Theological-Political Treatise
212




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə