Benedict de spinoza: Theological-Political Treatise



Yüklə 3,08 Kb.

səhifə91/114
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü3,08 Kb.
1   ...   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   ...   114

anyone. But this is not the reason why the tribes began to engage in wars
against each other and meddle in each other’s a¡airs. Rather they laun-
ched a hostile attack against the tribe of Benjamin which had o¡ended
the others and so seriously dissolved the bond of peace that none of the
confederates could feel safe in dealing with them. After ¢ghting three
battles, they ¢nally defeated them and slaughtered all of them indis-
criminately, guilty and innocent alike, by right of war, and afterwards
lamented their action, though their repentance came too late.
12
[
15] These examples con¢rm what we said just now about the right of
each individual tribe. But perhaps someone will ask who chose the suc-
cessor to the leader of each tribe? I can ascertain nothing certain about
this from Scripture itself, but conjecture that, as each tribe was divided
into families, the heads of which were chosen from the older members of
the family, the oldest of [the heads of families] duly succeeded to the
position of leader. It was from the older men that Moses chose the
seventy associates who formed the supreme council with him; those who
held the reins of government after the death of Joshua, are called ‘elders’
in Scripture; ¢nally ‘elders’ was very often used among the Hebrews to
mean ‘judges’, as I think is well-known.
Our purpose does not require us to settle this for certain. It su⁄ces
that after the death of Moses no one person, as I have shown, held all the
o⁄ces of the supreme commander. For nothing depended on the deci-
sion of one man or one council, or of the people, but rather some things
were administered by one tribe, others by the others, all with equal
rights; thus, it is entirely clear that, after the death of Moses, the state
was neither monarchical nor aristocratic nor democratic, but as we said,
theocratic. This was, ¢rstly, because the palace of the government was
the Temple, and it was only by virtue of the Temple that all the tribes
were fellow citizens, as we have shown. The second reason was that all
the citizens had to swear allegiance to God as their supreme judge, and
promised to obey him alone in all things absolutely; and ¢nally, the
supreme commander of them all, when one was needed, was chosen by
no one but God alone. Moses clearly prophesies this to the people in the
name of God at Deuteronomy
212
18.15, and the choice of Gideon, Samson
and Samuel testi¢es to it in practice. Hence we should not doubt that the
12
Judges, chs.
20^1.
The Hebrew state in the time of Moses
219


other faithful chiefs were chosen in a similar way, though this is not clear
from their history.
[
16] Now that all this has been established, it is time to see how much
this way of organizing the state could guide men’s minds, and discourage
both rulers and ruled from becoming either tyrants or rebels.
[
17] Those who administer a state or hold power inevitably try to lend
any wrong they do the appearance of right and try to persuade the people
that they acted honourably; and they often succeed, since the whole inter-
pretation of right or law is entirely in their hands. For there is no doubt
that they assume, due to this, the greatest liberty to do whatever they want
and whatever their desires prompt them to do, and conversely, lose much
of this freedom whenever the right to interpret the laws devolves upon
others, and likewise if the true interpretation of them is so plain to all that
no one can be in any doubt about it. From this it is evident that the
Hebrew leaders were deprived of a great opportunity for wrongdoing in
that the right to interpret the laws was given wholly to the Levites (see
Deuteronomy
21.5), who held no responsibility for government and had
no portion [of territory] along with the others and whose entire fortune
and position depended upon a true interpretation of the laws. [It also
helped] that the whole people was ordered to congregate in a certain place
once every seven years to learn the Laws from the priests, and, in addition,
that everyone had an obligation to read and reread the book of the Law by
himself continually and attentively (see Deuteronomy
31.9 ¡. and 6.7).The
leaders therefore had to take very good care, if only for their own sakes, to
govern entirely according to the prescribed laws, which were quite clearly
understood by all, if they wanted to be held in the highest honour by the
people who at that time revered them as ministers of God’s government
and as having the place of God. Otherwise they could not escape the most
intense kind of hatred, among their subjects, as intense as theological
hatred tends to be.
[
18] An additional means, plainly, and something invariably of the
utmost importance for curbing the boundless licentiousness of princes,
was that the military was formed from the whole body of the citizenry
(with no exemptions between the ages of twenty and sixty), and that the
leaders could not hire foreign mercenaries. This, unquestionably, was a
Theological-Political Treatise
220


very powerful restraint, for it is certain that
213
princes can oppress a people
simply by making use of a mercenary armed force, and they fear nothing
more than the liberty of their soldier-citizens, whose courage, toil and
expenditure of blood have won the state its freedom and glory. When
Alexander was about to encounter Darius in battle for the second time,
Parmenio o¡ered him [unacceptable] advice;
13
Alexander did not
rebuke Parmenio who had given this advice but Polyperchon who sup-
ported Parmenio. For as Curtius says at
4.13, he did not dare to rebuke
Parmenio again, since he had recently chastised him in stronger terms
than he would have wished. Neither was he able to suppress the liberty of
the Macedonians which he very much feared, as we have already said,
until he had more captives in his army than native Macedonians. Only
then could he give rein to his own headstrong temperament, which had
long been restrained by the liberty of the best citizens. If therefore this
liberty of citizen-soldiers restrains the leaders of a merely human state,
accustomed to appropriate for themselves all the credit for victories, how
much more must it have restrained the leaders of the Hebrews, whose
soldiers fought not for the glory of their leaders but the glory of God,
and engaged in battle only when they had received a response from God.
[
19] To this should be added that all the Hebrew leaders were united only
by the bond of religion. If any of them therefore rejected it and began to
violate the divine right of each person, the others would consider him an
enemy on this ground alone and rightly suppress him.
[
20] There was also, thirdly, the fear of a new prophet. If a man who
lived a blameless life showed by certain accepted signs that he was a
prophet, he had by this fact alone the supreme right of command like
that of Moses ^ which he exercised in the name of God who was
revealed to him alone ^ and not merely like the chiefs, who consulted
God through the high priest. There is no doubt that such men could
easily draw the oppressed people to themselves, and persuade them of
whatever they wanted even by trivial signs. On the other hand, if things
were well-run, the leader could stipulate beforehand that any prophet
should ¢rst appear before him so as to be examined by him, as to
13
On this occasion Alexander rejected the advice of Parmenio, his senior general, but thought it
more politic to rebuke one of Parmenio’s junior supporters for o¡ering bad counsel, rather than
risk rebuking Parmenio himself.
The Hebrew state in the time of Moses
221




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   ...   114


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə