C Peter King, from Jean Buridan’s Logic



Yüklə 0,69 Mb.

səhifə1/35
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0,69 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   35


c Peter King, from Jean Buridan’s Logic (Dordrecht: D. Reidel 1985) 3–82.

INTRODUCTION TO JEAN BURIDAN’S LOGIC

1. Jean Buridan: Life and Times

Buridan is best-known to philosophers for the example of “Buridan’s

Ass,” starving to death between two equidistant equally tempting bales of

hay, who appears in Spinoza, Ethica II, scholium to Proposition 49. But

this poor fragment of Buridan’s great reputation is as apocryphal as his sup-

posed amorous adventures with the Queen of France, famous from Fran¸

cois

Villon’s poem “La testament,” or his founding the University of Vienna:



Buridan’s ass is not to be found in Buridan, though his examples are stud-

ded with asses.

1

Our knowledge of Buridan’s life is sketchy.



2

We know that he was

French, but little else about his background; various examples in his writings

suggest a man familiar with Picardy. Just as we do not know where Buridan

was born, we do not know when he has born. He must have been born by

1300, but this is the only reliable inference we can make.

Buridan is first glimpsed in the pages of history in 1328, the rector of

the University of Paris, vir venerabilis et discretus, presiding over a debate

that took place on February 9. The next year, on 30 August 1329, he

received a benefice from Pope John XXII; on 2 November 1330 he received

another benefice from the same Pope, who addressed him each time as a

Master of Arts. We then lose sight of him until 25 September 1339, when

Buridan was a signatory to a condemnation of certain doctrines (supposedly

including those of William of Ockham); during this period he received an

expectation of a prebend from Pope Benedict XII. In 1340 he was again

rector of the University of Paris.

The last time he graces the pages of

history is as a figure signing a border treaty under the authority of the

University, on 12 July 1358.

*

All translations are mine. See the Bibliography for abbreviations, editions, and refer-



ences; when citing Latin texts I use classical orthography and occasionally alter the

given punctuation and capitalization.

1

Unless one identifies Plato as Buridan’s Ass: “He [Plato] said that if I am indifferent



and able to go to the left or right, for whatever reason I go to the right by the same

reason I go to the left, and conversely; therefore, either I go to each [direction], which

is impossible, or I go to neither until another determining sufficient cause comes along”

(QM 6.5 ff. 35vb–36ra).

2

The classic biographical work is Edmond Faral [1949], the source of the factual knowl-



edge of Buridan’s life described in the succeeding paragraphs.

– 1 –



2

INTRODUCTION TO JEAN BURIDAN’S LOGIC

From several remarks (e. g. TC 3.4.14) we know Buridan spent his

life as a career Master in the Faculty of Arts—a rarity, for the Faculty of

Arts was generally made up of students who were going on to advanced

study in theology, and there was a fast turnover.

These few facts are all we know of Buridan’s life. Yet we possess his

works (in large measure), and in them there is a wealth of material for the

philosopher. Buridan’s influence and reputation were immense, both during

his life and for centuries afterwards. He was known for his contributions to

ethics, physics, and, perhaps most important, for his philosophy of logic.

It is the latter to which this introduction and the translations are devoted.

Buridan’s mediæval voice speaks directly to modern concerns: the attempt

to create a genuinely nominalist semantics; paradoxes of self-reference; the

nature of inferential connections; canonical language; meaning and refer-

ence; the theory of valid argument. It is to be hoped that Buridan can

reclaim his lost reputation among contemporary philosophers for his pene-

trating and incisive views on these and other matters.

2. Buridan’s Treatises

The “Treatise on Supposition” [TS] is the fourth treatise of a much

longer work known as the Summulae de dialectica, the contents of which

Buridan himself describes in the beginning of the first chapter of the first

treatise:

We divide this work into nine treatises, of which the first will be

about sentences and their parts and passions; the second about

the predicables; the third about the categories; the fourth about

supposition; the fifth about the syllogism; the sixth about dialectical

lock; and the seventh about fallacies. An eighth [treatise] about

division, definition, and demonstration is added, which our author

did not deal with in his book; the ninth will be about the practice

of sophisms—but in my lectures I shall not follow the other lectures

with this last treatise.

“Our author” is Peter of Spain,

3

and “his book” is the Summulae logicales.



Buridan adopted this work as the basis of his lectures on logic, for the

reason he states in the last sentence of the Proemium to the Summulae de

dialectica :

Wishing to say certain general things about the whole of logic with-

out excessively painstaking investigation, I shall particularly rely

3

The edition of Peter of Spain I have used to check against Buridan’s text—the points



of comparison are virtually nonexistent—is De Rijk [1972].

c Peter King, from Jean Buridan’s Logic (Dordrecht: D. Reidel 1985) 3–82.




INTRODUCTION TO JEAN BURIDAN’S LOGIC

3

upon the brief treatise of logic the venerable Doctor, master Peter



of Spain, has already composed, analyzing and supplementing what

he wrote and said in another way when at times it seems to me

opportune.

The Summulae de dialectica is written as a commentary on Peter of Spain.

But there were topics Peter of Spain said little or nothing about; and some-

times what he did say Buridan regarded as hopeless. In the former case

Buridan wrote an independent treatise, as he remarks for the eighth and

ninth treatises listed. In the latter case Buridan simply jettisons the text

written by Peter of Spain and substitutes his own text, commenting upon

it. Such a case is the fourth treatise, the treatise on supposition.

The Summulae de dialectica is one of two or three major logical

works we have of Buridan’s: the ninth treatise seems to have been consid-

ered an independent work, called the Sophismata.

4

The other work is the



Treatise on Consequences [TC], translated here, an advanced independent

investigation in logic. If TS was the textbook for Buridan’s introductory

course on logic, TC is a handbook to the logic graduate seminar. The rest

of Buridan’s works on logic are quaestiones on the standard logical corpus:

Porphyry’s Isagoge, and Aristotle’s Categories, De interpretatione, Prior

Analytics, Posterior Analytics, Topics, and Rhetoric.

5

For TS I have used the edition of the text given by Maria Elena Reina



in “Giovanni Buridano: Tractatus de suppositionibus,” Rivista critica di

storia della filosofia (1959) 175–208 and 323–352. For TC I have used the

edition of the text given by Hubert Hubien, Iohannis Buridani tractatus de

consequentiis: ´

Edition critique, in the series Philosophes m´

edi´


evaux Vol. 16,

Universit´

e de Louvain 1976. Divergences from these texts are noted in the

translation where they occur.

3. Meaning and Mental Language

3.1 Levels of Language

Buridan and other logicians of the fourteenth century were inspired

by a remark Aristotle made in De interpretatione 1 16

a

3–8:


6

4

There is a modern edition of this work (although not a genuinely critical edition) in



Scott [1977]. An English translation is available in Scott [1966]. The last chapter,

Soph. 8, has been newly edited and translated in Hughes [1982]. Buridan’s references

to the Sophismata in TS

are not consistent: they are future and past, frequently

within a short compass—see e. g. TS 3.7.16 (past) and 3.7.23 (future).

5

Faral [1949] 496 lists several lost works of Buridan that probably dealt with logic: De



syllogismis, De relationibus, and works pertaining to metaphysics as well as logic.

6

I have not translated Aristotle’s original Greek, but rather the Latin version given by



c Peter King, from Jean Buridan’s Logic (Dordrecht: D. Reidel 1985) 3–82.




Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   35


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə