Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus): a technical Conservation Assessment Prepared for the usda forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Species Conservation Project December 12, 2006 James A. Sedgwick



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/29
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü1,74 Mb.
#80481
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   29


Peer Review Administered by

Society for Conservation Biology



Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus):

A Technical Conservation Assessment

Prepared for the USDA Forest Service,

Rocky Mountain Region,

Species Conservation Project

December 12, 2006

James A. Sedgwick

Ecosphere Ecological Services

2243 Main Ave, Suite 4

Durango, CO 81301




2

3

Sedgwick,  J.A.  (2006,  December  12).  Long-billed  Curlew  (Numenius  americanus):  a  technical  conservation 



assessment. [Online]. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region. Available: 

http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/

projects/scp/assessments/longbilledcurlew.pdf

 [date of access].



A

CKNOWLEDGMENTS

Ecosphere  Environmental  Services  wishes  to  thank  Gary  Patton  for  the  opportunity  to  participate  in  the 

USDA Forest Service Species Conservation Project. The technical assistance and constructive comments of Lynn 

Wickersham were instrumental in the completion of the manuscript. Numerous private organizations, federal agencies, 

and biologists volunteered their time and shared their unpublished data. Special thanks to Gary Patton, Mark Colwell, 

and an anonymous reviewer for valuable advice and comments on earlier drafts of this document.



A

UTHOR’S 

B

IOGRAPHY

James A. Sedgwick received his M.A. in zoology from the University of Montana for a comparative study of 

the breeding ecology of Hammond’s and dusky flycatchers and his Ph.D. in wildlife biology from Colorado State 

University. His dissertation research was on avian habitat relationships in a pinyon-juniper woodland. Currently a 

Research Biologist for the U.S. Geological Survey, he has continued studies of Empidonax flycatchers, with emphasis 

on geographic variation in song, lifetime reproductive success, population dynamics, and site and mate fidelity. His 

other research has included studies of avian response to grazing, habitat relationships of cavity-nesting birds, and 

phytosociology and demography of cottonwoods. Current address: USGS, Fort Collins Science Center, 2150 Centre 

Avenue, Fort Collins, CO 80525-8118. E-mail: Empidonaxj@netzero.com.

C

OVER 

P

HOTO 

C

REDIT

Long-billed curlew (Numenius americanus). © B. L. Sullivan. Used with permission.




2

3

S



UMMARY OF 

K

EY 

C

OMPONENTS FOR 

C

ONSERVATION OF

L

ONG-BILLED 

C

URLEW

Status

The  long-billed  curlew  (Numenius  americanus)  is  a  locally  common  breeding  bird  of  the  shortgrass  and 

mixed-grass  prairies  of  the  Great  Plains.  It  breeds  in  the  following  USDA  Forest  Service-administered  units 

in  Region  2:  Comanche  National  Grassland,  Colorado;  Cimarron  National  Grassland,  Kansas;  Oglala  National 

Grassland,  Nebraska;  and  Buffalo  Gap  National  Grassland,  South  Dakota.  The  species  winters  to  the  south  of 

Region  2.  There  is  no  accurate  estimate  of  the  current  population  size,  but  the  species  is  considered  vulnerable 

throughout its range. Continent-wide, it has been declining at 1.6 percent per year (P = 0.08; 1966–2004Breeding 

Bird  Survey  [BBS]).  The  greatest  declines,  however,  occurred  long  before  the  initiation  of  the  BBS,  and  they 

were  due  to  over  harvest  (1850 to 1917)  and  elimination  of  breeding  habitat.  Various  state,  federal,  and  private 

conservation organizations have ranked the long-billed curlew as a grassland “species of concern,” “priority,” “in 

need of conservation action,” or “imperiled.”

Primary Threats

Loss of native mixed-grass and shortgrass prairie to agriculture and development on breeding and wintering 

grounds is the greatest threat to the long-billed curlew. Although most rangeland loss to agriculture was historical, 

more recent losses are not insignificant. In Colorado, for example, 3.8 percent of the shortgrass and mixed-grass 

prairie east of the Rocky Mountains was lost to agriculture and urban expansion from 1982 to 1997. The associated 

negative impacts of disturbance and fragmentation also pose a threat to long-billed curlews. Increasing recreational 

activity and the use of pesticides are somewhat lesser threats. Also, any absolute changes in first-year survival or 

fertility rates will have major impacts on population dynamics.



Primary Conservation Elements, Management Implications and Considerations

While heavy grazing can be detrimental on arid grasslands, in the more mesic northern parts of its range the 

long-billed  curlew  may  require  moderate  to  heavy  grazing  to  maintain  habitat  condition.  Prescribed  burns  may 

be necessary in some areas to maintain the stature of breeding habitat and to reflect the historic spatial extent and 

temporal pattern of prairie wildfires. A major conservation issue in the 21

st

 Century, especially in Region 2, will be 



managing and mitigating the negative impacts of rapidly increasing oil and gas development.



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   29




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə