Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus): a technical Conservation Assessment Prepared for the usda forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region, Species Conservation Project December 12, 2006 James A. Sedgwick



Yüklə 1,74 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə7/29
tarix17.11.2018
ölçüsü1,74 Mb.
#80481
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   29

12

13

males per km



2

 in Idaho (n = 2 years; Redmond et al. 

1981), 0.59 to 2.36 pair per km

2

 in Utah (2 locations, 3 



years; Paton and Dalton 1994), and 2.08 to 2.13 pairs 

per km


2

 (Ohanjanian 1987), 3.33 to 5.00 pairs per km

2

 

(3 years; Ohanjanian 1992), and 0.46 to 0.80 pair per 



km

2

 (Hooper and Pitt 1996) in British Columbia.



In  winter,  curlews  are  distributed  in  the  United 

States mostly in coastal and inland regions of California, 

Texas,  and  Louisiana  (Figure  3).  In  California, 

long-billed  curlews  occur  along  the  coast,  in  the 

intermontane valleys of the Coast Range, in the Central 

Valley,  Antelope  Valley,  and  Imperial  Valley,  and  in 

the Salton Sea Basin (Small 1994). Along the Gulf of 

Mexico, long-billed curlews occur along the coast and 

in the coastal plain of Texas to western Louisiana. Total 

numbers seen per party hour on CBCs, 1966 to 2003, 

ranged  from  a  low  of  0.025  (2,650  individuals)  to  a 

high of 0.12 (10,312 individuals) (Figure 3; National 

Audubon Society 2005).

In  Mexico,  long-billed  curlews  winter  in 

suitable  estuary  habitat  along  both  coasts  of  Baja 

California  (Morrison  et  al.  1992)  and  along  the 

Pacific  coast  from  Sonora  south  to  Colima,  Mexico. 

Curlews  winter  along  the  Gulf  Coast  of  Mexico 

south  to  the  Yucatan  Peninsula  and  occur  locally 

below 2,500 m in interior Mexico (Howell and Webb 

1995).  Total  numbers  seen  per  party  hour  on  CBCs 

in  Mexico  from  1989  to  2003  ranged  from  a  low 

of  0.13  (32  individuals)  to  a  high  of  2.60  (2,448 

individuals)  (National  Audubon  Society  2005).

The breeding distribution of long-billed curlews 

has decreased with the destruction of breeding habitat 

and  over  harvesting  during  migration,  most  of  this 

occurring  prior  to  1900  (Dugger  and  Dugger  2002). 

Their  breeding  range  formerly  included  southern 

Michigan,  Iowa,  southern  Wisconsin,  coastal  Texas, 

Illinois, Arizona (Dugger and Dugger 2002), Manitoba 

(Thompson 1890), and Minnesota (Roberts 1919). Their 

former  breeding  range  may  also  have  included  parts 

of  the  southeastern  United  States  (i.e.,  the  Carolinas, 

Georgia,  and  Florida;  Wickersham  1902).  Curlews 

formerly bred in much of Kansas and the Dakotas, but 

they are now restricted to extreme southwestern Kansas 

and  the  western  Dakotas.  In  Colorado,  they  formerly 

nested regularly in the eastern prairies, but now they are 

restricted to extreme southeastern Colorado (McCallum 

et  al.  1977).  In  addition,  the  species  may  formerly 

have  been  more  abundant  across  its  present  range; 

populations today have become more isolated (Dugger 

and Dugger 2002).

Similar declines are thought to have occurred on 

the species’ winter range. Curlews were once common 

along the Atlantic Coast south of Massachusetts. They 

wintered  in  South  Carolina  (Bent  1929)  and  were 



Figure 3. Relative winter season distribution and abundance (birds per 100 party hr) of long-billed curlew based on 

Christmas Bird Count data from 1966 to 1989.




12

13

Long-billed Curlew 



SUR

3

2



1

0

1967



1972

1977


1982

1987


1992

1997


2002

YEAR

COUNT

common  during  winter  in  Florida  (Stevenson  and 

Anderson  1994).  Today,  sightings  along  the  Atlantic 

coast are extremely unusual.

Population trend

Historically,  the  breeding  range  of  long-billed 

curlews  has  contracted,  and  a  long-term  population 

decline  is  evident  (Dugger  and  Dugger  2002). 

Significant  declines  occurred  throughout  the  species’ 

historic range during the last half of the 1800’s (Grinnell 

et al. 1918, Bent 1929); loss of breeding habitat in the 

eastern  portions  of  its  historic  range  coincided  with 

curlew population declines on migration and wintering 

areas along the Atlantic Coast.

Population declines have continued to the present 

(e.g., Ryser 1985, South Dakota Ornithologists’ Union 

1991,  Sauer  et  al.  2005).  These  declines  have  been 

attributed to historical losses of breeding habitat and the 

conversion  of  native  prairies  to  agriculture  (Fairfield 

1968,  Gollop  1978,  McNicholl  1988),  and  are  likely 

to  continue  as  more  native  rangeland  is  converted  to 

cropland (Robbins et al. 1986) and urban development 

(Fairfield 1968). BBS data from 1966 to 2004 indicate 

that  survey-wide  (U.S.  and  southern  Canada),  long-

billed  curlews  are  declining  at  an  annual  rate  of  1.6 

percent per year (P = 0.08; Figure 4). Other statistically 

significant (P ≤ 0.05) declines by region (where >25 

BBS routes), include USFWS Region 6 (2.7 percent per 

year; Figure 5), the Central BBS Region (3.2 percent 

per  year;  Figure  6),  and  Colorado  (10.3  percent  per 

year). Marginally significant declines (0.05 <P ≤ 0.10) 

occurred in the Great Plains Roughlands Physiographic 

Stratum (2.8 percent per year; P = 0.09), South Dakota 

(2.8 percent per year; P = 0.07), and the United States 

(1.9  percent  per  year;  P  =  0.07).  The  BBS  trend 

estimates map (Figure 7) suggests that the declines are 

occurring  for  the  most  part  in  USFS  Region  2  states, 

plus much of Montana, Utah, and North Dakota. Only 

in  the  Great  Basin  do  curlew  populations  appear  to 

be  stable  (Dugger  and  Dugger  2002).  If  subspecific 

designations  are  valid  (see  Systematics  and  Species 

Description, above), Numenius americanus americanus 

(central  U.S.  populations)  has  suffered  a  relatively 

greater decline in breeding distribution and is currently 

declining at a faster rate than N. a. parvus (northern and 

western populations).

Activity pattern

In  Sonora,  Mexico,  northward  migration  occurs 

from  March  through  early  May  (Russell  and  Monson 

1998).  In  Costa  Rica,  long-billed  curlews  have  been 

recorded on their wintering grounds through mid-April 

(Stiles  and  Skutch  1989).  Early-spring  arrival  dates 

include  17  February  for  Texas  (Oberholser  1974), 

7  February  in  Nevada  (Alcorn  1988),  15  March  in 



Figure 4. Population trend (average number of birds per route) of long-billed curlew survey-wide (U.S. and Canada) 

from 1966 to 2004.





Yüklə 1,74 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   29




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə