The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0.85 Mb.

səhifə24/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0.85 Mb.
1   ...   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   ...   32

THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-53- 



Remember how cursed our old enemy is: which offereth us the kingdoms of this 

world that he might bereave us the kingdom of heaven: how false the fleshly 

pleasures: which therefore embrace us that they might strangle us: how deceitful these 

worldly honours: which therefore lift us up: that they might throw us down: how 

deadly these riches: which the more they feed us, the more they poison us: how short, 

how uncertain, how shadow-like false imaginary it is that all these things together 

may bring us: & though they flow to us as we would wish them. Remember again 

how great things be promised and prepared for them: which despising these present 

things desire and long for that country whose king is the Godhead, whose law is 

charity, whose measure is eternity. Occupy thy mind with these meditations and such 

other that may waken thee when thou sleepest, kindle thee when thou waxest cold, 

confirm thee when thou waverest, & exhibit the wings of the love of God while thou 

labourest to heavenward, that when thou comest home to us (which with great desire 

we look for) we may see not only him that we covet but also such a manner one as we 

covet. Fare well and love God whom of old thou hast begun to fear. At Ferrara the .ii. 

day of July the year of our redemption. M.CCCC.lxxxxii. 

 



PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-54- 


 

THE INTERPRETATION OF GIOVANNI PICO UPON 

THIS PSALM CONSERVA ME DOMINE

 

[38] Conserva me Domine quoniam speravi in Te. Dixi Domino: Deus meus es 



Tu,  quoniam  bonorum  meorum  non  eges.  Sanctis  qui  funt  in  terra  mirificavit 

voluntates  suas.  Multiplicate  sunt  infirmitates  eorum  postea  acceleraverunt.  Non 

congregabo conventicula eorum de sanguinibus: nec memor ero nominum eorum per 

labia  mea.  Dominus  pars  hereditatis  mee  &  calicis  mei:  Tu  es  qui  restitues 

hereditatem  meam  mihi.  Funes  occiderunt  mihi  in  preclaris:  etenim  hereditas  mea 

preclara  est  mihi.  Benedicam  Dominum  qui  tribuit  mihi  intellectum:  et  usque  ad 

noctem  increpuerunt  me  renes  mei.  Providebam  Deum  in  conspectu  meo  semper, 

quoniam  a  dextris  est  mihi  ne  commovear.  Propter  hoc  letatum  est  cor  meum  et 

exultavit  lingua  mea  insuper  et  caro  mea  requiescet  in  spe.  Quia  non  derelinques 

animam  meam  in  inferno:  nec  dabis  sanctum  tuum  videre  corruptionem.  Notas  mihi 

fecisti  vias  vite:  adimplebis  me  letitia  cum  vultu  tuo.  Delectationes  in  dextera  tua 

usque in finem

 



Conserva me Domine

. Keep me good Lord. If any perfect man look upon his 

own estate there is one peril therein, it is to wit, lest he wax proud of his virtue, and 

therefore David speaking in the person of a righteous man of his estate beginneth with 

these  words.  Conserva  me  Domine.  That is  to  say, keep me good  Lord: which word 

keep me: if it be well considered: taketh away all occasion of pride. For he that is able 

of himself any thing to get is able of himself that same thing to keep. He that asketh 

then  of  God  to  be  kept  in  the  state  of  virtue  signifieth  in  that  asking  that  from  the 

beginning he got not that virtue by himself. He then which remembreth it he attained 

his virtue: not by his own power but by the power of God: may not be proud thereof 

but rather humbled before God after those words of th apostle. Quid habes quod non 

accepisti

. What hast thou that thou hast not received. And if thou hast received it: why 

art thou proud thereof as though thou haddest not received it. Two words then be there 

which we should ever have in our mouth: the one. Miserere mei Deus. Have mercy on 

me Lord: when we remember our vice: that other. Conserva me Deus. Keep me good 

Lord: when we remember our virtue. 

 

Quoniam  speravi  in  Te

.  For  I  have  trusted  in  Thee.  This  one  thing  is  it  that 

maketh us obtain of God our petition, it is to wit,  when  we  have a  full hope & trust 

that we shall speed. If we observe these two things in our requests, it is to wit, that we 

require nothing but that which is good for us and it we require it ardently with a sure 

hope that God shall hear us, our prayers shall never be void. Wherefore when we miss 

the effect of our petition, either that is for that we ask such thing as is noyous unto us, 

for (as Christ saith) we wot never what we ask, and Jesus said whatsoever thee shall 

ask  in  my  name  it  shall  be  given  you  (this  name  Jesus  signifieth  a  Saviour,  and 

therefore  there  is  nothing  asked  in  the  name  of  Jesus  but  that  is  wholesome  and 

helping to the salvation of the asker) or else God heareth not our prayer because that 

though the thing it we require be good yet we ask it not well, for we ask it with little 

hope. And he that asketh doubtingly asketh coldly & therefore Saint James biddeth us 

ask in faith nothing doubting. 

 

Dixi  Domino

:  Deus  meus  es  Tu.  I  have  said  to  our  Lord:  my  God  art  Thou. 

After that he hath warded & fenced himself against pride he describeth in these words 



THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-55- 



his  estate.  All  the  estate  of  a  righteous  man  standeth  in  these  words.  Dixi  Domino: 

Deus  meus  es  Tu

.  I  have  said  to  our  Lord:  my  God  art  Thou.  Which  words  though 

they  seem  common  to  all  folk,  yet  are  there  very  few that may say them truly. That 

thing a man taketh for his God that he taketh for his chief good. And that thing taketh 

he for his chief good which only had, though all other things lack, he thinketh himself 

happy,  &  which  only  lacking,  though  he  have  all  other  things,  he  thinketh  himself 

unhappy. The niggard then saith to his money: deus meus es tu, my God art thou. For 

though honour fail & health and strength and friends, so he have money he thinketh 

himself well. And if he have all those things that we have spoken of, if money fail he 

thinketh  himself  unhappy.  The  glutton saith  unto his fleshly lust, the ambitious man 

saith to his vainglory: my God art thou. See then how few may truly say these words, 

I  have  said  to  our  Lord:  my  God  art  Thou.  For  only  he  may  truly  say  it  which  is 

content  with  God  alone:  so  that  if  there  were  offered  him  all  the  kingdoms  of  the 

world and all the good that is in earth and all the good that is in heaven, he would not 

once  offend  God to  have  them  all. In these words then, I have  said to our Lord: my 

God art Thou, standeth all the state of a right wise man. 

 

Quoniam  bonorum  meorum  non  eges

.  For  thou  hast  no  need  of  my  good.  In 

these words he showeth the cause why he saith only to our Lord: Deus meus es tu, my 

God art Thou. The cause is for that only our Lord hath no need of our good. There is 

no  creature  but that it needeth other creatures, and though they be of less perfection 

than itself, as philosophers and divines proven: for if these more imperfect creatures 

were  not,  the  other  that  are  more  perfect  could  not  be.  For  if  any  part  of  the  whole 

university  of  creatures  were  destroyed  &  fallen  to  nought  all  the  whole  were 

subverted. For certainly one part of that university perishing all parties perish, and all 

creatures be parts of that university, of which university God is no part, but he is the 

beginning nothing there upon depending. For nothing truly won he by the creation of 

this  world,  nor  nothing  should  he  lose  if  the  world  were  annihilate  and  turned  to 

nought  again.  Than  only  God  is  he  which  hath no  need of our good. Well ought we 

certainly to be ashamed to take such thing for God as hath need of us, & such is every 

creature. Moreover we should not accept for God, it is to say for the chief goodness, 

but only that thing which is the most sovereign goodness of all things, and that is not 

the goodness of any creature, only therefore to our Lord ought we to say: my God art 

Thou. 


 

Sanctis qui sunt in terra ejus mirificavit voluntates suas.

 To his saints that are 

in the land of him he hath made marvellous his wills. After God should we specially 

love them which are nearest joined unto God, as be the holy angels & blessed saints 

that  are  in  their  country  of  heaven:  therefore  after  that  he  had  said  to  our  Lord:  my 

God art thou: he addeth therunto that our Lord hath made marvellous his wills, that is 

to say he hath made marvellous his loves and his desires toward his saints that are in 

the land of him, that is to wit, in the country of heaven which is called the land of God 

and  the  land  of  living  people.  And  verily  if  we  inwardly  consider  how  great  is  the 

felicity  of  that  country  &  how  much  is  the  misery  of  this  world,  how  great  is  the 

goodness and charity of those blessed citizens: we shall continually desire to be hence 

that  we  were  there.  These  things  &  such  other  when  we  remember,  we  should  ever 

more take heed that our meditations be not unfruitful, but that of every meditation we 

should always purchase one virtue or other, as for ensample by this meditation of the 

goodness of that heavenly country we should win this virtue that we should not only 

strongly suffer death and patiently when our time cometh or if it were put unto us for 

the faith of Christ: but also we should willingly and gladly long therefore, desiring to 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə