The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0.85 Mb.

səhifə22/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0.85 Mb.
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   ...   32

THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-49- 



ourselves any other end than the endless fruition of the infinite goodness both to soul 

& body in everlasting peace. 

 

Fare well and fear God.[31] 



 

THE MATTER OR ARGUMENT OF THE EPISTLE OF PICO TO ANDREW 

CORNEUS. 

 

This Andrew a worshipful man and a special friend of Pico had by his letters 



given  him  counsel  to  leave  the  study  of  philosophy,  as  a  thing  in  which  he  thought 

Pico  to  have  spent  time  enough  &  which:  but  if  it  were  applied  to  the  use  of  some 

actual business: he judged a thing vain & unprofitable: wherefore he counselled Pico 

to  surcease  of  study  and  put  himself  with  some  of  the  great  princes  of  Italy,  with 

whom (as this Andrew said) he should be much more fruitfully occupied than always 

in  the  study  &  learning  of  philosophy,  to  whom  Pico  answered  as  in  this  present 

epistle  appeareth.  Where  he  saith  these  words  (By  this  it  should  follow  that  it  were 

either servile or at the least wise not princely to make the study of philosophy other 

than mercenary) thus he meaneth. Mercenary we call all those things which we do for 

hire or reward. Then he maketh philosophy mercenary & useth it not as cunning but 

as merchandise which studieth it not for pleasure of itself: or for the instruction of his 

mind in mortal virtue: but to apply it to such things where he may get some lucre or 

worldly advantage. 

 

GIOVANNI PICO EARL OF MIRANDOLA TO ANDREW CORNEUS 



GREETING. 

 

Ye  exhort  me  by  your  letters  to  the  civil  and  active  life,  saying  that  in  vain: 



and in manner to my rebuke & shame: have I so long studied in philosophy: but if I 

would  at  the  last  exercise  the  learning  in  the  entreating  of  some  profitable  acts  & 

outward  business.  Certainly  my  wellbeloved  Andrew  I  had  cast  away  both  cost  & 

labour of my study: if I were so minded that I could find in my heart in this matter to 

assent  unto  you  &  follow  your  counsel.  This  is  a  very  deadly  and  monstrous 

persuasion  which  hath  entered  the  minds  of  men:  believing  that  the  studies  of 

philosophy are of estates & princes: either utterly not to be touched: or at least wise 

with extreme lips to be sipped: and rather to the pomp & ostentation of their wit than 

to  the  culture  &  profit  of  their  minds  to  be  little  &  easily  tasted.  The  words  of 

Neoptolemus they hold utterly for a sure decree: that philosophy is to be studied either 

never or not long:[32] but the sayings of wise men they repute for japes & very fables: 

that sure & steadfast felicity standeth only in the goodness of the mind, & that these 

outward things of the body or of fortune little or nought pertain unto us. But here thee 

will say to me thus. I am content thee study, but I would have you outwardly occupied 

also. And I desire you not so to embrace Martha that thee should utterly forsake Mary. 

Love  them  &  use  them  both,  as  well  study  as  worldly  occupation.  Truly  my 

wellbeloved friend in this point I gainsay you not, they that so do I find no fault in nor 

I blame them not, but certainly it is not all one to say we do well if we do so: and to 

say  we  do  evil  but  if  we  do  so.  This  is  far  out  of  the  way:  to  think  that  from 

contemplation to the active living, that is to say from the better to the worse, is none 

error  to  decline:  and  to  think  that  it  were  shame  to  abide  still  in  the  better  and  not 

decline. Shall a man then be rebuked because that he desireth and ensueth virtue only 

for  itself:  because  he  studieth  the  mysteries  of  God:  because  he  ensearcheth  the 



PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-50- 


counsel of nature: because he useth continually this pleasant ease & rest: seeking none 

outward  thing,  despising  all  other  thing:  sith  those  things  are  able  sufficiently  to 

satisfy the desire of their followers. By this reckoning it is a thing either servile or at 

the  least wise  not  princely  to  make  the  study  of  wisdom  other  than  mercenary:  who 

may well hear this, who may suffer it. Certainly he never studied for wisdom which so 

studied  therefore  that  in  time  to  come  either  he  might  not  or  would  not  study 

therefore,  this  man  rather  exercised  the  study  of  merchandise  than  of  wisdom.  Ye 

write unto me that it is time for me now to put myself in household with some of the 

great  princes  of  Italy  but  I  see  well  that  as  yet  ye  have  not  known  the  opinion  that 

philosophers have of themselves, which (as Horace saith) repute themselves kings of 

kings:[33] they love liberty: they can not bear the proud manners of estates: they can 

not  serve.  They  dwell  with  themselves  and  be  content  with  the  tranquillity  of  their 

own mind, they suffice themselves & more, they seek nothing out of themselves: the 

things that are had in honour among the common people: among them be not holden 

honourable.  All  that  ever  the  voluptuous  desire  of  men  thirsteth  for:  or  ambition 

sigheth  for:  they  set  at  nought  &  despise.  Which  while  it  belongeth  to  all  men:  yet 

undoubtedly  it  pertaineth  most  properly  to  them  whom  fortune  hath  so  liberally 

favoured that they may live not only well and plenteously but also nobly. These great 

fortunes lift up a man high and set him out to the show: but oftentimes as a fierce and 

a  skittish  horse  they  cast  off  their  master.  Certainly  alway  they  grieve  and  vex  him 

and  rather  tear  him  than  bear  him.  The  golden  mediocrity,  the  mean  estate  is  to  be 

desired which shall bear us as it were in hands[34] more easily: which shall obey us & 

not master us. I therefore abiding firmly in this opinion set more by my little house, 

my study, the pleasure of my books, the rest and peace of my mind: than by all your 

kings'  palaces,  all  your  common  business,  all  your  glory,  all  the  advantage  that  ye 

hawk after and all the favour of the court. Nor I look not for this fruit of my study that 

I may thereby hereafter be tossed in the flood and rumbling of your worldly business: 

but that I may once bring forth  the children that I travail on: it I may give out some 

books  of  mine  own  to  the  common  profit  which  may  somewhat  savour  if  not  of 

cunning yet at the least wise of wit and diligence. And because ye shall not think that 

my travail & diligence in study is any thing remitted or slacked: I give you knowledge 

that after great fervent labour with much watch and infatigable travail I have learned 

both the Hebrew language and the Chaldee, and now have I set hand to overcome the 

great  difficulty  of  the  Araby  tongue.  These  my  dear  friend  be  things  which  to 

appertain to a noble prince I have ever thought and yet think. Fare thee well. Written 

at Paris the .xv. day of October the year of grace. M.CCCC.lxxxxii.[35] 

 

THE ARGUMENT OF THE EPISTLE FOLLOWING. 

 

After that Giovanni Francesco the nephew of Pico had (as it appeareth in the 



first epistle of Pico to him) began a change in his living: it seemeth by this letter that 

the company of the court where he was conversant diversely (as it is their unmannerly 

manner) descanted thereof to his rebuke as them thought: but as truth was unto their 

own. Some of them judged it folly, some called it hypocrisy, some scorned him, some 

slandered him, of all which demeanour (as we may of this epistle conjecture) he wrote 

unto this earl Pico his uncle, which in this letter comforted & encourageth him, as it is 

in the course thereof evident. 

 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə