The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0.85 Mb.

səhifə30/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0.85 Mb.
1   ...   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32

PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-74- 


 

A Prayer Of Pico Mirandola Unto God. 

 

O holy God of dreadful majesty 



Verily one in .iii. and three in one: 

Whom angels serve, whose work all creatures be, 

Which heaven and earth directest all alone 

We Thee beseech good Lord with woeful moan, 

Spare us wretches & wash away our guilt 

That we be not by thy just anger spilt. 

 

In stray balance of rigorous judgement 



If Thou shouldst our sin ponder and weigh: 

Who able were to hear thy punishment. 

The whole engine of all this world I say, 

The engine that enduren shall for aye, 

With such examination might not stand 

Space of a moment in thine angry hand. 

 

Who is not born in sin original. 



Who doth not actual sin in sundry wise. 

But thou good Lord art he that sparest all 

With piteous mercy tempering justice: 

For as Thou doest rewards us devise 

Above our merit, so doest thou dispense 

Thy punishment far under our offence. 

 

More is thy mercy far than all our sin: 



To give them also that unworthy be 

More godly is, and more mercy therein. 

Howbeit worthy enough are they pardie: 

Be they never so unworthy: whom that he 

List to accept: wheresoever he taketh 

Whom he unworthy findeth worthy maketh. 

 

Wherefore good Lord that aye merciful art, 



Unto thy grace and sovereign dignity 

We silly wretches cry with humble heart: 

Our sins forget and our malignity: 

With piteous eyes of thy benignity 

Friendly look on us once thine own, 

Servants or sinners whether it liketh Thee. 

 



THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-75- 



Sinners, if Thou our crime behold, certain: 

Our crime the work of our uncourteous mind: 

But if thy gifts Thou behold again, 

Thy gifts noble wonderful and kind: 

Thou shalt us then the same persons find 

Which are to Thee, and have been long space 

Servants by nature, children by thy grace. 

 

But this thy goodness wringeth us alas: 



For we whom grace had made thy children dear 

Are made thy guilty folk by our trespass: 

Sin hath us guilty made this many a year. 

But let thy grace, thy grace that hath no peer, 

Of our offence surmounten all the peace,[52] 

That in our sin thine honour may increase. 

 

For though thy wisdom, though thy sovereign power 



May otherwise appear sufficiently: 

As things which thy creatures every hour 

All with one voice declare and testify: 

Thy goodness yet, thy singular mercy, 

Thy piteous heart, thy gracious indulgence 

Nothing so clearly showeth as our offence. 

 

What but our sin hath showed that mighty love: 



Which able was thy dreadful majesty 

To draw down into earth fro heaven above 

And crucify God: that we poor wretches we 

Should from our filthy sin i-cleansed be 

With blood and water of thine own side, 

That streamed from thy blessed wounds wide. 

 

Thy love and pity thus O heavenly King 



Our evil maketh matter of thy goodness. 

O love, O pity, our wealth ay providing, 

O goodness serving thy servants in distress. 

O love, O pity, well nigh now thankless. 

O goodness, mighty, gracious and wise, 

And yet almost now vanquished with our vice. 

 

Grant I Thee pray such heat into mine heart 



That to this love of thine may be egal. 

Grant me fro Sathanas service to astert, 

With whom me rueth so long to be thrall. 

Grant me good Lord and Creator of all 




PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-76- 


The flame to quench of all sinful desire, 

And in thy love set all mine heart afire. 

 

That when the journey of this deadly life 



My silly ghost hath finished, and thence 

Departen must without his fleshly wise, 

Alone into his Lord's high presence: 

He may Thee find: O Well of Indulgence: 

In thy lordship not as a lord: but rather 

As a very tender loving father. 

 

Amen. 


 


THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-77- 



 

NOTES. 

 

 



collation of More's text with the original showed that in a few 

instances he had inaccurately or inadequately rendered it. In such 

cases, or where for any other reason it seemed desirable, the words 

of the original are given in the notes, the letters G.F.P. or P. 

subjoined in brackets indicating that the reference is to the Latin 

life by Giovanni Francesco Pico or to Pico's works. A few 

misprints have been silently corrected. 

 

1. This  lady  may be either Jocosa or Joyce, daughter  of Richard Culpeper of 



Hollingborne,  Kent,  and  wife  of  Ralph  Leigh,  undersheriff  of  London,  or  her 

daughter, Jocosa or Joyce Leigh, sister of Sir John Leigh who succeeded to the manor 

of  Stockwell,  Surrey,  on  the  death  of  his  uncle,  Sir  John  Leigh,  27  Aug.,  1523. 

Tanswell,  "History  and  Antiquities  of  Lambeth,"  pp.  41-2.  Manning  and  Bray, 

"History of Surrey," iii. 497-8. 

 

2.  Pico  was  the  third  son  and  youngest  child  of  Giovanni  Francesco  Pico, 



Count of Mirandola and Concordia in the Modenese. He had two brothers, Galeotto, 

and Antonio Maria, and three sisters, Catterina, Lucrezia and Giulia. Galeotto had to 

wife  Bianca,  daughter  of  Niccolò  d'Este,  lord  of  Ferrara;  Antonio  Maria  married 

twice,  viz.,  (1)  Costanza,  daughter  of  Sante  Bentivoglio,  lord  of  Bologna,  (2)  a 

Neapolitan  lady.  Pico's  eldest  sister,  Catterina,  married  (1)  Leonello  Pio,  lord  of 

Carpi,  by  whom  she  had  Alberto,  mentioned  in  connection  with  Pico's  death;  (2) 

Rodolfo,  lord  of  Gonzaga.  Carpi  and  Gonzaga  are  little  towns  in  the  Modenese. 

Lucrezia  also  married  twice,  viz.  (1)  Pino  Ordelaffo,  lord  of  Forli;  (2)  Gherardo 

Appiani  di  Piombino,  Count  of  Montagnana.  The  third  sister,  Giulia,  took  the  veil. 

 

Pico's  pedigree  has  been  carried  back  as  far  as  Manfredo  of  Reggio,  a 



contemporary  of  Charlemagne;  but  the  descent  from  the  nephew  of  Constantine  is 

mythical. 

 

"Memorie  Storiche  della  Mirandola,"  Litta,  "Celebr.  Fam.  Ital."  Pico,  Opera 



(ed. 1601), Life by G. F. Pico; and "Adversus Astrologos," ii. cap. ix. 

 

3.  The  Boiardi.  Giulia  was  the  daughter  of  Feltrino  Boiardo,  first  Count  of 



Scandiano,  and  aunt  of  the  poet,  Matteo  Maria  Boiardo,  author  of  the  "Orlando 

Innamorato." Litta, "Celebr. Fam. Ital." Venturi, "Storia di Scandiano," p. 83. 

 

4.  Paulinus  was  secretary  to  S.  Ambrose,  and  wrote  his  life;  from  which  the 



story in the text is taken. 

 

5.  "Flavo  et  inaffectato  capillitio"(G.F.P.).  Apparently  Pico  was  somewhat 



careless about the arrangement of his hair. 




Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə