The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0.85 Mb.

səhifə5/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0.85 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32

THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-11- 



his  biographer  describes  him,  and  with  that  sanguine,  clear  skin,  decenti  rubore 

interspersa

, as with the light of morning upon it; and he has a true place in that group 

of great Italians who fill the end of the fifteenth century with their names, he is a true 

HUMANIST. For the essence of humanism is that belief of which he seems never to 

have  doubted,  that  nothing  which  has  ever  interested  living  men  and  women  can 

wholly lose its vitality--no language they have spoken, nor oracle beside which they 

have hushed their voices, no dream which has once been entertained by actual human 

minds,  nothing  about  which  they  have  ever  been  passionate,  or  expended  time  and 

zeal. 

 



PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-12- 


 

Title Page of 1890 Edition 

 

GIOVANNI PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA: 



HIS LIFE BY HIS NEPHEW GIOVANNI FRANCESCO PICO: 

ALSO THREE OF HIS LETTERS; HIS INTERPRETATION OF PSALM XVI.; HIS 

TWELVE RULES OF A CHRISTIAN LIFE; HIS TWELVE POINTS OF A 

PERFECT LOVER; AND HIS DEPRECATORY HYMN TO GOD. 

TRANSLATED FROM THE LATIN 

BY 


SIR THOMAS MORE. 

 

EDITED WITH INTRODUCTION AND NOTES 



BY 

J. M. RIGG, ESQ., 

OF LINCOLN S INN, BARRISTER-AT-LAW.

 

LONDON: 



PUBLISHED BY DAVID NUTT IN THE STRAND. 

MDCCCXC. 

 



THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-13- 



 

INTRODUCTION. 

By 

J. M. Rigg 

 

 



 

IOVANNI  PICO  DELLA  MIRANDOLA,  "the  Phoenix  of  the 

wits,"  is  one  of  those  writers  whose  personality  will  always  count 

for  a  great  deal  more  than  their  works.  His  extreme,  almost 

feminine  beauty, high rank, and chivalrous character, his immense 

energy  and  versatility,  his  insatiable  thirst  for  knowledge,  his 

passion  for  theorizing,  his  rare  combination  of  intellectual 

hardihood  with  genuine  devoutness  of  spirit,  his  extraordinary  precocity,  and  his 

premature death, make up a personality so engaging that his name at any rate, and the 

record  of  his  brief  life,  must  always  excite  the  interest  and  enlist  the  sympathy  of 

mankind, though none but those, few in any generation, who love to loiter curiously in 

the  bypaths  of  literature  and  philosophy,  will  ever  care  to  follow  his  eager  spirit 

through  the labyrinths of recondite speculation which it once thrilled with such high 

and generous hope. For us, indeed, of the latter end of the nineteenth century, trained 

in the exact methods, guided by the steady light of modern philosophy and criticism, 

it is no easy matter to enter sympathetically into the thoughts of men who lived while 

as yet these were not, men who spent their strength in errant efforts, in blind gropings 

in  the  dark,  on  abortive  half-solutions  or  no-solutions  of  problems  too  difficult  for 

them,  mere  ignes  fatui,  it  would  seem,  or  at  best  mere  brilliant  meteor  stars 

illuminating  the  intellectual  firmament  with  a  transitory  trail  of  light,  and  then 

vanishing to leave the darkness more visible, yet without whose mistakes and failures 

and apparently futile waste of power philosophy and criticism would not have come 

into being. 

 

Among  such  wandering  meteoric  apparitions  not  the  least  brilliant  was  Pico 



della Mirandola. Born in 1463, he grew to manhood in time to witness and participate 

in the effectual revival of Greek learning in Italy; yet his earliest bias was scholastic, 

and  a  schoolman in  grain  he  remained  to the day of his death. How strongly he had 

felt  the  influence  of  the  schoolmen,  how  little  disposed  he  was  to  follow  the 

humanistic  hue  and  cry  of  indiscriminate  condemnation,  may  be  judged  from  the 

eloquent  apology  for  them  which,  in  the  shape  of  a  letter  to  his  friend  Ermolao 

Barbaro,  he  published  in  1485.  It  was  the  fashion  to  stigmatize  the  schoolmen  as 

barbarians because they knew no Greek and could not write classical Latin. That was 

the head and front of their offending in the eyes of men who had no idea of a better 

method  of  philosophizing  than  theirs,  nor  indeed  any  interest  in  philosophy,  mere 

rhetoricians, grammarians, and pedagogues, while at any rate the schoolmen, however 

rude their style, were serious thinkers, who in grappling with the deepest problems of 

science  human  and  divine  displayed  the  rarest  patience,  sagacity,  subtlety  and 



PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-14- 


ingenuity. Such is the gist of Pico's plea on behalf of the "barbarians," in urging which 

he exhausts the resources of rhetoric, and the ingenuity of the advocate; nor is there 

reason  to  doubt  that  it  represents  at  least  the  embers  of  a  very  genuine  enthusiasm. 

That challenge, also, which he issued at Rome, and in every university in Italy in the 

winter  of  1486-7,  summoning  as  if  by  clarion call every intellectual knight-errant in 

the peninsula to try conclusions with him in public disputation in the eternal city after 

the feast of Epiphany, does it not recall the celebrated exploit of Duns Scotus at Paris, 

when,  according  to  the  tradition,  he  won  the  title  of Doctor  Subtilis  by  refuting  two 

hundred objections to the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary 

in a single day? Only, as befitted "a great lord of Italy," Pico's tournament is to be on 

a  grander  scale.  Duns  had  but  one  thesis  to  defend;  Pico  offers  to  maintain  nine 

hundred, and lest poverty should reduce the number of his antagonists he offers to pay 

their  travelling  expenses.  Moreover,  to  Duns,  Aquinas,  and  other  of  the  schoolmen, 

Pico is beholden for not a few of his theses; of the rest, some are drawn direct from 

Plato,  others  from  Neo-Pythagorean,  Neo-Platonic  and  syncretist  writers,  while  a 

certain number appear to be original. Pico, however, was not so fortunate as Duns: the 

church  smelt  heresy  in  his  propositions,  and  Pope  Innocent  VIII.,  though  he  had  at 

first  authorised,  was  induced  to  prohibit  their  discussion.  (Bull  dated  4th  August, 

1487).  Thirteen  were  selected  for  examination  by  a  special  commission  and  were 

pronounced heretical. Pico, however, so far from bowing to its decision, wrote in hot 

haste  an  elaborate  "Apologia"  or  defence  of  his  orthodoxy,  which,  had  it  not  been 

more ingenious than conclusive, might perhaps have been accepted; as it was, it only 

brought him into further trouble. 

 

This  Apology  "elucubrated,"  as  he  tells,  "properante  stilo"  in  twenty  nights, 



Pico dedicated to Lorenzo de Medici, modestly describing it as "exiguum sane munus, 

sed  fidei  meæ,  sed  observantiæ  profecto  in  omne  tempus  erga  te  maxime  non  leve 

testimonium," "a trifling gift indeed, but as far as possible from being a slight token of 

my  loyalty,  nay,  of  my  devotion  to  you."  Hasty  though  its  composition  was,  it 

certainly  displays  no  lack  of  either  ingenuity,  subtlety,  acuteness,  learning,  or  style. 

Evidently  written  out  of  a  full  mind,  it  represents  Pico's  mature  judgment  upon  the 

abstruse  topics  which  it  handles,  and  is  a  veritable  masterpiece  of  scholastic 

argumentation.  After  a  brief  prologue  detailing  the  circumstances  which  gave 

occasion  to  the  work  Pico  proceeds  to  discuss  seriatim  the  thirteen  "damnatæ 

conclusiones,"  and  the  several  objections  which  had  been  made  to  them.  The  tone 

throughout  is  severe  and  dry  and  singularly  free  from  heat  or  asperity.  Some  of  the 

theses  are  treated  at  considerable  length,  others  dismissed  in  a  page  or  two,  or  even 

less.  Altogether,  when  the  rapidity  of  its  composition  is  borne  in  mind,  the  treatise 

appears little less a prodigy. 

 

The  obnoxious  theses  were  as  follows:--  (1)  That  Christ  did  not  truly  and  in 



real presence, but only quoad effectum, descend into hell; (2) that a mortal sin of finite 

duration is not deserving of eternal but only of temporal punishment; (3) that neither 

the cross of Christ, nor any image, ought to be adored in the way of worship; (4) that 

God  cannot  assume  a  nature  of  any  kind  whatsoever,  but  only  a  rational  nature;  (5) 

that  no  science  affords  a  better  assurance  of  the  divinity  of  Christ  than  magical  and 

cabalistic  science;  (6)  that  assuming  the  truth  of  the  ordinary  doctrine  that  God  can 

take upon himself the nature of any creature whatsoever, it is possible for the body of 

Christ to be present on the altar without the conversion of the substance of the bread 

or  the  annihilation  of  "paneity;"  (7)  that  it  is  more  rational  to  believe  that  Origen  is 

saved  than  that  he  is  damned;  (8)  that  as  no  one's  opinions  are  just  such  as  he  wills 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə