The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə17/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   40

 

28 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

Finally, because secondary supply from new scrap decreases with each cycle of recycling, Table 

9 also highlights that, if primary supply were to cease for whatever reason, secondary supply 

from new scrap would decrease geometrically and cease altogether within a very short period. 

Thus, although secondary supply from manufacturing waste can buffer market shocks in the 

short term, it does not isolate manufacturers from prolonged primary supply disruptions. 

This sample analysis should lead readers to be cautious when estimating total demand and 

supply. As we have illustrated, when considering sources of supply, secondary production from 

new scrap introduces significant potential for double counting in estimates for both supply and 

demand. To eliminate this risk, secondary supply from new scrap should rather be seen as a 

reduction in the demand for primary indium.  

3.7.1  Recycling Process 

The technology used in recycling indium is mostly proprietary. Although recovery techniques 

differ,

27

 Roskill (2010) describes a process in which indium is recovered from spent ITO targets 



through the following steps:  

1.  Nitric acid is used to form indium nitrate, followed by neutralization, which produces 

indium hydroxide.  

2.  Indium oxide is formed through thermal decomposition and dissolved in sulfuric acid.  

3.  Metallic indium can be produced from the resulting solution electrolytically (Roskill 

2010). 


As previously discussed, refining capacity to reclaim spent ITO targets has expanded 

considerably since 1996 to reduce primary demand for indium. Japan, China, and to a lesser 

extent, South Korea and Belgium, have most of this capacity (Table 10 and Figure 13). The 

geographic dispersion of secondary production is expected, because recyclers of new scrap can 

reduce transportation costs and cycle times by locating close to high-tech manufacturing centers 

that sputter ITO in the manufacturing of LCDs or other applications.  



3.7.2  Estimates of Secondary Supply 

A bottom-up analysis of global secondary indium production indicates that ~610 tonnes of 

refined indium are “measured” as being produced through the recycling of manufacturing waste, 

most of which is sourced through the application of ITO in flat-panel displays.

28

 

Roskill (2010) states that total secondary indium production was ~602 tonnes in 2009; Indium 



Corp. estimates that ~1,000 tonnes of indium is produced from new scrap every year 

(Mikolajczak 2009). 

The geographic dispersion of secondary production (Figure 13) is located close to where most 

LCD manufacturing takes place: Japan, China, and South Korea.  

 

                                                 



27

 For example, Han et al. (2002) describe a process for the recovery of indium from ITO consisting of chemical precipitation 

followed by solvent extraction. 

28

 As discussed earlier, it’s important to highlight that “measured” secondary production from new scrap can be significantly 



overestimated because of the potential for double counting in a closed-loop recycling environment.  


 

29 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

Table 10. Indium Recycling Capacity of Known Producers (2013) 

Source: Own estimates; Roskill (2010) 



Location 

Country 

Operating Company/Investors 

Indium (tpa) 

Hoboken 


Belgium 

Umicore 


50.00 

Hydrometal-Lien 

plant 

Belgium 


Hydrometal SA, Jean Goldschmidt 

International S.A 

0.50 

Trail Smelter 



Canada 

Teck Resources Limited 

5.00 

Nanjing 718 factory 



China 

Nanjing Germanium Factory Co. Ltd. 

150.00 

Fremat Freiberg 



plant 

Germany 


Gfe Fremat GmbH 

1.00 


Fukuoka 

Japan 


Asahi Pretec Corp 

200.00 


Kosaka plant 

Japan 


Akita Rare Metals, Dowa Holdings Co., Ltd 

150.00 


Hitachi metal 

recycling complex 

Japan 

Nikko Environmental Services Co, 



Nippon Mining and Metals Co. Ltd. 

6.00 


Onahama 

Japan 


Onahama Smelting and Refining Co., Ltd, of 

which Mitsubishi Materials Group owns 50% 

6.00 

Onsan 


South 

Korea 


Korea Zinc Co. Ltd. 

40.00 


Total 

 

 

608.50 

 

 



Figure 13. Geographic distribution of secondary refined indium 

Source: Own estimates; company reports; Roskill 2010 

 

Using the values from Table 10, if one assumes that 608.5 tpa of refined indium are produced



938 tonnes

29

 of indium enter the recycling process and approximately 330 tonnes are lost due to 



refining inefficiency any given year. Similarly, ~1,341 tonnes appears to be demanded by 

                                                 

29

 Calculated using the ratios in Table 10 as 



608.5

83

128



=

 . Solving for ‘x’ yields ~938 tonnes.  Similarly, solving for ‘y’ in 

608.5

83

183



y

=

 ., yields ~1,341 tonnes. More detail is provided in Appendix B. 






Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə