The Availability of Indium: The Present, Medium Term, and Long Term



Yüklə 1,06 Mb.

səhifə16/40
tarix06.03.2018
ölçüsü1,06 Mb.
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   40

 

26 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

At present, new scrap used in the secondary production of indium is mainly sourced from spent 

ITO sputtering targets. Sputtering is the process used in electronics manufacturing to apply ITO 

to transparent and conductive electrodes for use in LCD or flat-panel display applications. Moss 

et al. (2011) state that flat-panel displays and other ITO applications represent ~84% of total 

indium demand. Due to inefficiencies in the current manufacturing process, only ~30% of the 

indium is successfully deposited on the ITO thin-films when using planar sputtering targets. 

More expensive rotary targets can yield higher efficiencies (Gibson and Hayes 2011). Up to70% 

of remaining indium is, therefore, conceivably available for recovery and reuse. 

According to the USGS, before about 1996

24

 very little of the indium in ITO manufacturing 



waste was recycled (Brown 1996). Since then, ITO producers in Japan, China, and South Korea 

have installed significant recycling capacities. Unfortunately, because of metallurgical 

complexities, not all the indium in new scrap can be recycled and reused in the manufacturing 

process as losses. Overall, recovery is high and various estimates have placed the efficiency of 

the ITO recycling process at 60%–70% (Phipps et al. 2007; Mikolajczak 2009). The turnaround 

time for the recycling process is also an important consideration for recyclers, owing to 

potentially significant inventory carrying costs and maximization of plant throughput capacity. 

Market pressures and improvements in technology have enabled recyclers to decrease the recycle 

claim time to about 15 days. These improvements reduce the overall demand for primary indium.  

Given this level of recycling efficiency, if we assume that new scrap is sent to a recycling plant 

and that the same indium continues to be used in a closed loop between the manufacturer and the 

recycler, the overall effective deposition of indium in ITO applications increases from 30% (in a 

single pass) to ~55%

25

 (Table 9). 



Of the 100 units of primary indium entering the manufacturing process, only 30 units are 

successfully deposited. With a closed-loop recycling process, manufacturers can increase the 

effective indium deposition from 30 units to 55 units. Therefore, of the total 55 units of indium 

used, 30 were sourced from primary supply and 25 were sourced from the new scrap. Had 

recycling not taken place, the manufacturer would have had to source an additional 25 units of 

primary indium, but recycling reduced the primary indium demand. For example, without 

recycling, manufacturers would have required an additional 83 units

26

 of primary indium to 



successfully meet the demand of an additional 25 units. The introduction of a closed-loop 

recycling system enabled the 25 units to be produced and reduced potential demand for primary 

indium by 83 units. 

                                                 

24

 In 1996, indium prices rose to ~$175 to ~$550/kg, indicating that at that point, indium could be recycled at a lower cost than 



primary indium could be produced. Since the peaks in 1996, prices of indium dropped but did not seem to affect recycling 

capacity, indicating that the recycling of indium remained profitable at prices of ~$175/kg. 

25

 If 100 units of indium metal enter the manufacturing process, approximately 30 units (or 30%) are deposited on thin-films in 



the first round of sputtering. If the manufacturer recycles its manufacturing waste, ~65% of the 70 “wasted” units indium would 

be recovered through recycling. If the process repeats itself enough times and one assumes a closed-loop manufacturing and 

recycling process, the overall indium lost is ~45% while ~55% of the initial 100 units of indium is successfully deposited.  

26

 Calculated as: 30/100 = 25 /s.  Solving for ‘s’ yields 83.333. 




 

27 


This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications 

Table 9. Overall Utilization of Indium in a Hypothetical ITO Sputtering Application 

With Closed Loop Recycling of Manufacturing Waste 

Indium Secondary Production Loop 

Cycle 



















10 

Total 

Units available for ITO 

100.0

c

 



45.5 

20.7  9.4 

4.3 

2.0 


0.9 

0.4 


0.2 

0.1 


183

d

 



Units successfully 

deposited

a

 

30.0



c

 

13.7 



6.2 

2.8 


1.3 

0.6 


0.3 

0.1 


0.1 

0.0 


55

e

 



Units available for 

recycling

a

 

70.0 



31.9 

14.5  6.6 

3.0 

1.4 


0.6 

0.3 


0.1 

0.1 


128

f

 



Units successfully 

recycled


b

 

45.5 



20.7 

9.4 


4.3 

2.0 


0.9 

0.4 


0.2 

0.1 


0.0 

83

g



 

Units lost to waste

i

 

24.5 



11.1 

5.1 


2.3 

1.1 


0.5 

0.2 


0.1 

0.0 


0.0 

45

h



 

% of indium deposited 

 

55% 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

% of indium wasted 



 

45% 

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

The deposition success rate is assumed to be 30%; therefore, 70% of indium is available for recycling. We assume that if indium 



is not successfully deposited upon application of ITO, it is available for recycling. In other words, there are no “losses” at the 

manufacturing stage, only at the recycling stage. 

b

 Indium recycling efficiency is estimated to be 65% per recycling cycle. 



c

 Primary indium. All other figures relate to indium that is either entering recycling or has been recycled. 

d

 If 100 units of primary indium are used in ITO applications with recycling, the ITO applications will appear to have consumed 



100 units (primary) + 83 units (secondary) indium. The figure of 183 units of indium likely represents the figure of indium 

demand reported by manufacturers. 

d

 Of the original 100 units of primary indium entering the manufacturing process, 55 units (55%) are effectively deposited when 



factoring in that spent ITO targets and other manufacturing wastes are recycled.  

Of every 100 units of primary indium used in ITO applications, 128 units are a quantity that might appear to be entering the 



recycling plant because the same indium may enter the plant more than once per period.  

Of every 100 units of primary indium used in ITO applications, 70 units enter the recycling plant. Because the 70 units enter 



more than once, the plant appears to produce 83 units of refined indium over 10 cycles. This figure of 83 units is most likely 

representative of recycling plant throughput as measured by producers.  

h

 Of the 100 units of primary indium entering the manufacturing process, 45 units (45%) are forever lost. This is due to a 



combination of: deposition efficiency, which drives the number of times the same indium must be recycled, and recycling 

efficiency.  

Units of indium discarded in the waste stream may be recoverable at some later stage. We do not, however, have information 



about the concentration of indium in the waste piles or the technical challenges of recovering this indium. 

Source: Own calculations; Mikolajczak (2009)

 

The calculations in Table 9 also highlight the significant potential for inflated estimates of 



reported supply and demand from double counting. Because manufacturers are most likely 

reporting total consumption of indium in ITO applications by quoting the amount of indium 

purchased, they may indicate that they used 183 units of indium over the period. However, as we 

have shown, only 100 units entered the process, of which only 55 units were successfully 

deposited. Similarly, new scrap recyclers may report that they produced 83 units of indium over 

the period, because these would have been shipped from their facilities. Together with the 100 

units reported by the primary producer, reported figures by all producers might lead one to 

believe, incorrectly, that total supply over the period was 183 units. Again, total supply was only 

100 units, of which 55 were deposited (30 from primary sources) and 45 were lost.  





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   ...   40


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə