The life of pico della mirandola



Yüklə 0.85 Mb.

səhifə13/32
tarix25.07.2018
ölçüsü0.85 Mb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   32

THOMAS MORE et al. 

 

-29- 



recent  death  of  Lorenzo.  The  minor  letters  exhibit  Pico  in  the  pleasant  light  of  the 

scholar  writing  to  his  friends  to  give  or  solicit  information  on  various  literary 

questions.  One  closes  them,  however,  with  a  sigh  of  regret  that  the  scholar  should 

predominate so much over the man. 

 

How  thankful  we  should  have  been  for  a  few  easy  gossiping  letters  in  the 



vulgar  tongue  revealing  Pico  to  us  as  he  was  in  his  moments  of  complete  abandon

Perhaps, however, he knew none such, and there was nothing to reveal that he has not 

revealed. Sense of humour he seems certainly to have lacked; I have not found in him 

the least suggestion that he had any faculty of hearty laughing in him at all. If he ever 

had it, severe study must have crushed it out of him. Probably the basis of his nature 

was  a  deep  religious  melancholy,  not  at  all  lightened  by  the  fact  that  learning  had 

impaired his hold on the faith. 

 

As  his  short  life  drew  towards  its  close  Pico's  preoccupation  with  religion 



became more intense and exclusive. Besides the "Rules" of a Christian Life, and the 

"Interpretation"  of  Psalm  XVI,  translated  by  More,  he  wrote  an  Exposition  of  the 

Lord's  Prayer,  and  projected,  but  did  not  live  to  execute  a  Commentary  on  the  New 

Testament,  for  which  he  prepared  himself  by  diligent  collation  of  such  MSS.  as  he 

could  come  by;  also  a  defence  of  the  Vulgate  and  of  the  Septuagint  version  of  the 

Psalms  against  the  criticisms  of  the  Jewish  scholars,  and  an  elaborate  apology  for 

Christianity  against  seven  classes  of  opponents;  to  wit  (1)  atheists,  (2)  idolaters,  (3) 

Jews, (4) Mahometans, (5) Christians who reject a portion of the faith, (6) Christians 

who adulterate the faith with profane superstitions, (7) orthodox Christians who live 

unholy lives. Some idea of the scale of this vast undertaking may be gathered from the 

fact that the treatise "Adversus Astrologos," which occupies 240 closely printed folio 

pages formed only a small fragment of it. 

 

But while thus zealous for the defence of the faith, Pico seems never to have 



seriously contemplated entering the Church, though often urged to do so not only by 

Savonarola but by other of his friends, who thought he might reasonably aspire to the 

dignity  of  cardinal.  Their  solicitude  for  his  advancement  he  rebuked  with  a  haughty 

"Non  sunt  cogitationes  meæ  cogitationes  vestræ."  Probably  he  considered  that  he 

could  render  religion  truer  service  in  the  character  of  lay  advocate  than  if  he  were 

trammelled by clerical offices. 

 

Short as his life was, he survived his three most intimate friends, Lorenzo de' 



Medici, Ermolao Barbaro, and Politian, all of whom died within the two years 1492-4. 

Probably  the  grief  caused  by  this  succession  of  misfortunes  had  much  to  do  with 

inducing or aggravating the fever of which he died hardly two months after Politian, 

on 17th Nov. 1494. The corpse, invested by Savonarola's own hands with the habit of 

the order of the Frati Predicanti, in which he had ardently desired to enrol Pico during 

his  life,  was  buried  in  the  church  of  S.  Marco.  The  tomb  was  inscribed  with  the 

epitaph: 

 

"Joannes jacet hic Mirandola: cætera norunt 



Et Tagus, et Ganges, forsan et Antipodes." 

 

Ficino, who had been to him "in years as a father, in intimacy as a brother, in 



affection  as  a  second  self,"  wrote  another  epitaph,  which  was  not,  however,  placed 

upon  the  tomb:  "Antistites  secretiora  mysteria  raro  admodum  concedunt  oculis, 




PICO DELLA MIRANDOLA 

-30- 


statimque  recondunt.  Ita  Deus  mortalibus  divinum  philosophum  Joannem  Pieum 

Mirandolam trigesimo (sic) anno maturum." 

 

The  generous  enthusiasm  which  prompted  Politian  to  confer  upon  his  friend 



the  high-sounding  title  of  "Phoenix  of  the  wits"  (Fenice degli  ingegni) has  not  been 

justified by events. Once sunk in his ashes the Phoenix never rose again. 

 

The pious care of Giovanni Francesco Pico, who published his uncle's life and 



works at Venice in 1498, did much, indeed, to avert the oblivion which ultimately fell 

upon him. This edition, however, was imperfect, the Theses and the Commentary on 

Benivieni's  poem,  with  some  minor  matters  being  omitted.  These  were  added  in  the 

Basel edition of 1601. The "Golden Letters" have passed through many editions, the 

last  that  of  Cellario  in  1682.  The  Commentary  on  Celestial  and  Divine  Love  was 

reprinted as late as 1731. 

 

Pico figures in a dim and ever dimmer way in the older histories of philosophy 



from  Stanley,  who  gives  a  rude  and  imperfect  translation  of  the  "Commentary"  to 

Hegel, who dismisses him and his works in a few lines. More recently, however, one 

of  Hegel's  laborious  fellow-countrymen,  Georg  Dreydorff,  discovered  a  system  in 

Pico and expounded it.* 

*[Note:  "Das  System  des  Johann  Pico  Grafen  von  Mirandola  and  Concordiat" 

Marburg, 1858.] 

 

But most Englishmen probably owe such interest as he excites in them to Mr. 



Pater's  charming  sketch  in  his  dainty  volume  of  studies  entitled  "The  Renaissance," 

[see  above]  or  the  slighter  notices  in  Mr.  J.  A.  Symonds'  "Renaissance  in  Italy,"  or 

Mr. Seebohm's "Oxford Reformers." 

 

The  chronicles  of  Mirandola,  edited  for  the  municipality  in  1872,  under  the 



title  "Memorie  Storiche  della  Città  e  dell'  Antico  Ducato  della  Mirandola,"  are  an 

authority of capital importance for the history of the Pico family and its connexions. 

The  notes  to  Riccardo  Bartoli's  "Elogio  al  Principe  Pico"  (1791)  also  contain  some 

valuable original matter. The critical judgment of the last century on Pico's services to 

the  cause  of  the  revival  of  learning  is  given  by  Christoph  Meiners  in 

"Lebensbeschreibungen 

berühmter 

Manner 


der 

Wiederherstellung 

der 

Wissenschaften." Some of Pico's letters translated, into the ponderous English of the 



period,  connected  by  a  thread  of  biography,  and  illustrated by  erudite  notes,  will  be 

found  in  W.  Parr  Greswell's  "Memoirs  of  Angelus  Politianus,"  etc.  1805.  The  best 

modern  Italian  biography  is  that  by  F.  Calori  Cesis,  entitled  "Giovanni  Pico  della 

Mirandola detto La Fenice degli Ingegni" (2nd edn. 1872). 

 





Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   ...   32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©genderi.org 2017
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə